Subpart A General

Subpart B General Interpretations

Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions

Subpart D Occupational Health and Environmental Controls

Subpart E Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

Subpart F Fire Protection and Prevention

Subpart G Signs, Signals, and Barricades

Subpart H Materials Handling, Storage, Use, and Disposal

Subpart I Tools - Hand and Power

Subpart J Welding and Cutting

Subpart K Electrical

Subpart L Scaffolds

Subpart M Fall Protection

Subpart N Helicopters, Hoists, Elevators, and Conveyors

Subpart O Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations

Subpart P Excavations

Subpart Q Concrete and Masonry Construction

Subpart R Steel Erection

Subpart S Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams, and Compressed Air

Subpart T Demolition

Subpart U Blasting and the Use of Explosives

Subpart V Electric Power Transmission and Distribution

Subpart W Rollover Protective Structures; Overhead Protection

Subpart X Stairways and Ladders

Subpart Y Commercial Diving Operations

Subpart Z Toxic and Hazardous Substances

Subpart AA Confined Spaces in Construction

Subpart BB [Reserved]

Subpart CC Cranes & Derricks in Construction

Authority: 40 U.S.C. 3701; 29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657; and Secretary of Labor¿s Order No. 12¿71 (36 FR 8754), 8¿76 (41 FR 25059), 9¿83 (48 FR 35736), 1¿90 (55 FR 9033), 4¿2010 (75 FR 55355), or 1¿2012 (77 FR 3912), as applicable. Section 1926.250 also issued under 29 CFR part 1911.

[59 FR 40729, Aug. 9, 1994; 76 FR 33611, June 8, 2011; 77 FR 23118, April 18, 2012]
All materials stored in tiers shall be stacked, racked, blocked, interlocked, or otherwise secured to prevent sliding, falling or collapse.
Maximum safe load limits of floors within buildings and structures, in pounds per square foot, shall be conspicuously posted in all storage areas, except for floor or slab on grade. Maximum safe loads shall not be exceeded.
Aisles and passageways shall be kept clear to provide for the free and safe movement of material handling equipment or employees. Such areas shall be kept in good repair.
When a difference in road or working levels exist, means such as ramps, blocking, or grading shall be used to ensure the safe movement of vehicles between the two levels.
Material stored inside buildings under construction shall not be placed within 6 feet of any hoistway or inside floor openings, nor within 10 feet of an exterior wall which does not extend above the top of the material stored.
Each employee required to work on stored material in silos, hoppers, tanks, and similar storage areas shall be equipped with personal fall arrest equipment meeting the requirements of Subpart M of this part.
Noncompatible materials shall be segregated in storage.
Bagged materials shall be stacked by stepping back the layers and cross-keying the bags at least every 10 bags high.
Materials shall not be stored on scaffolds or runways in excess of supplies needed for immediate operations.
Brick stacks shall not be more than 7 feet in height. When a loose brick stack reaches a height of 4 feet, it shall be tapered back 2 inches in every foot of height above the 4-foot level.
When masonry blocks are stacked higher than 6 feet, the stack shall be tapered back one-half block per tier above the 6-foot level.
Used lumber shall have all nails withdrawn before stacking.
Lumber shall be stacked on level and solidly supported sills.
Lumber shall be so stacked as to be stable and self-supporting.
Lumber piles shall not exceed 20 feet in height provided that lumber to be handled manually shall not be stacked more than 16 feet high.
Structural steel, poles, pipe, bar stock, and other cylindrical materials, unless racked, shall be stacked and blocked so as to prevent spreading or tilting.
Storage areas shall be kept free from accumulation of materials that constitute hazards from tripping, fire, explosion, or pest harborage. Vegetation control will be exercised when necessary.
Portable and powered dockboards shall be strong enough to carry the load imposed on them.
Portable dockboards shall be secured in position, either by being anchored or equipped with devices which will prevent their slipping.
Handholds, or other effective means, shall be provided on portable dockboards to permit safe handling.
Positive protection shall be provided to prevent railroad cars from being moved while dockboards or bridge plates are in position.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 49 FR 18295, Apr. 30, 1984; 54 FR 24334, June 7, 1989; 58 FR 35173, June 30, 1993; 59 FR 40829, Aug. 9, 1994; 61 FR 5507, Feb. 13, 1996]
Rigging equipment for material handling shall be inspected prior to use on each shift and as necessary during its use to ensure that it is safe. Defective rigging equipment shall be removed from service.
Employers must ensure that rigging equipment:
Has permanently affixed and legible identification markings as prescribed by the manufacturer that indicate the recommended safe working load;
Not be loaded in excess of its recommended safe working load as prescribed on the identification markings by the manufacturer; and
Not be used without affixed, legible identification markings, required by paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section.
Rigging equipment, when not in use, shall be removed from the immediate work area so as not to present a hazard to employees.
Special custom design grabs, hooks, clamps, or other lifting accessories, for such units as modular panels, prefabricated structures and similar materials, shall be marked to indicate the safe working loads and shall be proof-tested prior to use to 125 percent of their rated load.
This section applies to slings used in conjunction with other material handling equipment for the movement of material by hoisting, in employments covered by this part. The types of slings covered are those made from alloy steel chain, wire rope, metal mesh, natural or synthetic fiber rope (conventional three strand construction), and synthetic web (nylon, polyester, and polypropylene).
Each day before being used, the sling and all fastenings and attachments shall be inspected for damage or defects by a competent person designated by the employer. Additional inspections shall be performed during sling use, where service conditions warrant. Damaged or defective slings shall be immediately removed from service.
Welded alloy steel chain slings shall have permanently affixed durable identification stating size, grade, rated capacity, and sling manufacturer.
Hooks, rings, oblong links, pear-shaped links, welded or mechanical coupling links, or other attachments, when used with alloy steel chains, shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the chain.
Job or shop hooks and links, or makeshift fasteners, formed from bolts, rods, etc., or other such attachments, shall not be used.
Employers must not use alloy steel-chain slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.
Whenever wear at any point of any chain link exceeds that shown in Table H-1, the assembly shall be removed from service.

Table H - 1. -- MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEAR AT ANY POINT OF LINK
Chain size, (inches) Maximum allowable wear (inch)
14 364
38 564
12 764
58 964
34 532
78 1164
1 316
118 732
114 14
138 932
112 516
134 1132
In addition to the inspection required by other paragraphs of this section, a thorough periodic inspection of alloy steel chain slings in use shall be made on a regular basis, to be determined on the basis of (A) frequency of sling use; (B) severity of service conditions; (C) nature of lifts being made; and (D) experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. Such inspections shall in no event be at intervals greater than once every 12 months.
The employer shall make and maintain a record of the most recent month in which each alloy steel chain sling was thoroughly inspected, and shall make such record available for examination.
Employers must not use improved plow-steel wire rope and wire-rope slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.
Protruding ends of strands in splices on slings and bridles shall be covered or blunted.
Wire rope shall not be secured by knots, except on haul back lines on scrapers.
The following limitations shall apply to the use of wire rope:
An eye splice made in any wire rope shall have not less than three full tucks. However, this requirement shall not operate to preclude the use of another form of splice or connection which can be shown to be as efficient and which is not otherwise prohibited.
Except for eye splices in the ends of wires and for endless rope slings, each wire rope used in hoisting or lowering, or in pulling loads, shall consist of one continuous piece without knot or splice.
Eyes in wire rope bridles, slings, or bull wires shall not be formed by wire rope clips or knots.
Wire rope shall not be used if, in any length of eight diameters, the total number of visible broken wires exceeds 10 percent of the total number of wires, or if the rope shows other signs of excessive wear, corrosion, or defect.
When U-bolt wire rope clips are used to form eyes, Table H-2 shall be used to determine the number and spacing of clips.

Table H - 2. -- NUMBER AND SPACING OF U-BOLT WIRE ROPE CLIPS
Improved plow steel, rope diameter (inches) Number of clips Minimum spacing (inches)
Drop forged Other material
12 3 4 3
58 3 4 334
34 4 5 412
78 4 5 514
1 5 6 6
118 6 6 634
114 6 7 712
138 7 7 814
112 7 8 9
When used for eye splices, the U-bolt shall be applied so that the "U" section is in contact with the dead end of the rope.
[Reserved]
Slings shall not be shortened with knots or bolts or other makeshift devices.
Sling legs shall not be kinked.
Slings used in a basket hitch shall have the loads balanced to prevent slippage.
Slings shall be padded or protected from the sharp edges of their loads.
Hands or fingers shall not be placed between the sling and its load while the sling is being tightened around the load.
Shock loading is prohibited.
A sling shall not be pulled from under a load when the load is resting on the sling.
Cable laid and 6 × 19 and 6 × 37 slings shall have a minimum clear length of wire rope 10 times the component rope diameter between splices, sleeves or end fittings.
Braided slings shall have a minimum clear length of wire rope 40 times the component rope diameter between the loops or end fittings.
Cable laid grommets, strand laid grommets and endless slings shall have a minimum circumferential length of 96 times their body diameter.
Fiber core wire rope slings of all grades shall be permanently removed from service if they are exposed to temperatures in excess of 200 °F (93.33 °C). When nonfiber core wire rope slings of any grade are used at temperatures above 400 °F (204.44 °C) or below minus 60 °F (15.55 °C), recommendations of the sling manufacturer regarding use at that temperature shall be followed.
Welding of end attachments, except covers to thimbles, shall be performed prior to the assembly of the sling.
All welded end attachments shall not be used unless proof tested by the manufacturer or equivalent entity at twice their rated capacity prior to initial use. The employer shall retain a certificate of the proof test, and make it available for examination.
Wire rope slings shall have permanently affixed, legible identification markings stating size, rated capacity for the type(s) of hitch(es) used and the angle upon which it is based, and the number of legs if more than one.
Employers must not use natural- and synthetic-fiber rope slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.
All splices in rope slings provided by the employer shall be made in accordance with fiber rope manufacturers recommendations.
In manila rope, eye splices shall contain at least three full tucks, and short splices shall contain at least six full tucks (three on each side of the centerline of the splice).
In layed synthetic fiber rope, eye splices shall contain at least four full tucks, and short splices shall contain at least eight full tucks (four on each side of the centerline of the splice).
Strand end tails shall not be trimmed short (flush with the surface of the rope) immediately adjacent to the full tucks. This precaution applies to both eye and short splices and all types of fiber rope. For fiber ropes under 1-inch diameter, the tails shall project at least six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck. For fiber ropes 1-inch diameter and larger, the tails shall project at least 6 inches beyond the last full tuck. In applications where the projecting tails may be objectionable, the tails shall be tapered and spliced into the body of the rope using at least two additional tucks (which will require a tail length of approximately six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck).
For all eye splices, the eye shall be sufficiently large to provide an included angle of not greater than 60° at the splice when the eye is placed over the load or support.
Knots shall not be used in lieu of splices.
Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings, except for wet frozen slings, may be used in a temperature range from minus 20 °F (-28.88 °C) to plus 180 °F (82.2 °C) without decreasing the working load limit. For operations outside this temperature range and for wet frozen slings, the sling manufacturer's recommendations shall be followed.
Spliced fiber rope slings shall not be used unless they have been spliced in accordance with the following minimum requirements and in accordance with any additional recommendations of the manufacturer:
In manila rope, eye splices shall consist of at least three full tucks, and short splices shall consist of at least six full tucks, three on each side of the splice center line.
In synthetic fiber rope, eye splices shall consist of at least four full tucks, and short splices shall consist of at least eight full tucks, four on each side of the center line.
Strand end tails shall not be trimmed flush with the surface of the rope immediately adjacent to the full tucks. This applies to all types of fiber rope and both eye and short splices. For fiber rope under 1 inch (2.54 cm) in diameter, the tail shall project at least six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck. For fiber rope 1 inch (2.54 cm) in diameter and larger, the tail shall project at least 6 inches (15.24 cm) beyond the last full tuck. Where a projecting tail interferes with the use of the sling, the tail shall be tapered and spliced into the body of the rope using at least two additional tucks (which will require a tail length of approximately six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck).
Fiber rope slings shall have a minimum clear length of rope between eye splices equal to 10 times the rope diameter.
Knots shall not be used in lieu of splices.
Clamps not designed specifically for fiber ropes shall not be used for splicing.
For all eye splices, the eye shall be of such size to provide an included angle of not greater than 60 degrees at the splice when the eye is placed over the load or support.
Fiber rope slings shall not be used if end attachments in contact with the rope have sharp edges or projections.
Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present:
Abnormal wear.
Powdered fiber between strands.
Broken or cut fibers.
Variations in the size or roundness of strands.
Discoloration or rotting.
Distortion of hardware in the sling.
Employers must use natural- and synthetic-fiber rope slings that have permanently affixed and legible identification markings that state the rated capacity for the type(s) of hitch(es) used and the angle upon which it is based, type of fiber material, and the number of legs if more than one.
The employer shall have each synthetic web sling marked or coded to show:
Name or trademark of manufacturer.
Rated capacities for the type of hitch.
Type of material
Rated capacity shall not be exceeded.
Synthetic webbing shall be of uniform thickness and width and selvage edges shall not be split from the webbing's width.
Fittings shall be:
Of a minimum breaking strength equal to that of the sling; and
Free of all sharp edges that could in any way damage the webbing.
Stitching shall be the only method used to attach end fittings to webbing and to form eyes. The thread shall be in an even pattern and contain a sufficient number of stitches to develop the full breaking strength of the sling.
When synthetic web slings are used, the following precautions shall be taken:
Nylon web slings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of acids or phenolics are present.
Polyester and polypropylene web slings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of caustics are present.
Web slings with aluminum fittings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of caustics are present.
Synthetic web slings of polyester and nylon shall not be used at temperatures in excess of 180 °F (82.2 °C). Polypropylene web slings shall not be used at temperatures in excess of 200 °F (93.33 °C).
Synthetic web slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present:
Acid or caustic burns;
Melting or charring of any part of the sling surface;
Snags, punctures, tears or cuts;
Broken or worn stitches; or
Employers must not use shackles with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the shackle by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.
The manufacturer's recommendations shall be followed in determining the safe working loads of the various sizes and types of specific and identifiable hooks. All hooks for which no applicable manufacturer's recommendations are available shall be tested to twice the intended safe working load before they are initially put into use. The employer shall maintain a record of the dates and results of such tests.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35173, June 30, 1993; 76 FR 33611, June 8, 2011; 77 FR 23118, Apr. 18, 2012]
Whenever materials are dropped more than 20 feet to any point lying outside the exterior walls of the building, an enclosed chute of wood, or equivalent material, shall be used. For the purpose of this paragraph, an enclosed chute is a slide, closed in on all sides, through which material is moved from a high place to a lower one.
When debris is dropped through holes in the floor without the use of chutes, the area onto which the material is dropped shall be completely enclosed with barricades not less than 42 inches high and not less than 6 feet back from the projected edge of the opening above. Signs warning of the hazard of falling materials shall be posted at each level. Removal shall not be permitted in this lower area until debris handling ceases above.
All scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish shall be removed from the immediate work area as the work progresses.
Disposal of waste material or debris by burning shall comply with local fire regulations.
All solvent waste, oily rags, and flammable liquids shall be kept in fire resistant covered containers until removed from worksite.
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