Subpart A Purpose

Subpart B Scope

Subpart C Recordkeeping Forms and Recording Criteria

Subpart D Other OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Requirements

Subpart E Reporting Fatality, Injury and Illness Information to the Government

Subpart F Transition From the Former Rule

Subpart G Definitions

Authority:
29 U.S.C. 657, 673, 5 U.S.C. 553, and Secretary of Labor's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912, Jan. 25, 2012).
Within eight (8) hours after the death of any employee as a result of a work-related incident, you must report the fatality to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor.
Within twenty-four (24) hours after the in-patient hospitalization of one or more employees or an employee's amputation or an employee's loss of an eye, as a result of a work-related incident, you must report the in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA.
You must report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye using one of the following methods:
By telephone or in person to the OSHA Area Office that is nearest to the site of the incident.
By telephone to the OSHA toll-free central telephone number, 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742).
By electronic submission using the reporting application located on OSHA's public Web site at www.osha.gov.
No, if the Area Office is closed, you must report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye using either the 800 number or the reporting application located on OSHA's public Web site at www.osha.gov.
You must give OSHA the following information for each fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye:
The establishment name;
The location of the work-related incident;
The time of the work-related incident;
The type of reportable event (i.e., fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye);
The number of employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;
The names of the employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;
Your contact person and his or her phone number; and
A brief description of the workrelated incident.
If the motor vehicle accident occurred in a construction work zone, you must report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye. If the motor vehicle accident occurred on a public street or highway, but not in a construction work zone, you do not have to report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA. However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.
No, you do not have to report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA if it occurred on a commercial or public transportation system (e.g., airplane, train, subway, or bus). However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.
Yes, your local OSHA Area Office director will decide whether to investigate the event, depending on the circumstances of the heart attack.
You must only report a fatality to OSHA if the fatality occurs within thirty (30) days of the work-related incident. For an in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye, you must only report the event to OSHA if it occurs within twenty-four (24) hours of the work-related incident. However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.
If you do not learn about a reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye at the time it takes place, you must make the report to OSHA within the following time period after the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye is reported to you or to any of your agent(s): Eight (8) hours for a fatality, and twenty-four (24) hours for an in-patient hospitalization, an amputation, or a loss of an eye.
If you do not learn right away that the reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye was the result of a work-related incident, you must make the report to OSHA within the following time period after you or any of your agent(s) learn that the reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye was the result of a work-related incident: Eight (8) hours for a fatality, and twenty-four (24) hours for an inpatient hospitalization, an amputation, or a loss of an eye.
OSHA defines inpatient hospitalization as a formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.
No, you do not have to report an in-patient hospitalization that involves only observation or diagnostic testing. You must only report to OSHA each inpatient hospitalization that involves care or treatment.
An amputation is the traumatic loss of a limb or other external body part. Amputations include a part, such as a limb or appendage, that has been severed, cut off, amputated (either completely or partially); fingertip amputations with or without bone loss; medical amputations resulting from irreparable damage; amputations of body parts that have since been reattached. Amputations do not include avulsions, enucleations, deglovings, scalpings, severed ears, or broken or chipped teeth.

[66 FR 6133, Jan. 19, 2001; 79 FR 56187-56188, September 18, 2014]
When an authorized government representative asks for the records you keep under part 1904, you must provide copies of the records within four (4) business hours.
The government representatives authorized to receive the records are:
A representative of the Secretary of Labor conducting an inspection or investigation under the Act;
A representative of the Secretary of Health and Human Services (including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health—NIOSH) conducting an investigation under section 20(b) of the Act, or
A representative of a State agency responsible for administering a State plan approved under section 18 of the Act.
OSHA will consider your response to be timely if you give the records to the government representative within four (4) business hours of the request. If you maintain the records at a location in a different time zone, you may use the business hours of the establishment at which the records are located when calculating the deadline.

[66 FR 6134, Jan. 19, 2001; 81 FR 91810 Dec 19, 2016; 82 FR 20549 May 3, 2017]
If your establishment had 250 or more employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and this part requires your establishment to keep records, then you must electronically submit information from the three recordkeeping forms that you keep under this part (OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, OSHA Form 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, and OSHA Form 301 Injury and Illness Incident Report) to OSHA or OSHA's designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than the date listed in paragraph (c) of this section of the year after the calendar year covered by the forms.
If your establishment had 20 or more employees but fewer than 250 employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and your establishment is classified in an industry listed in appendix A to subpart E of this part, then you must electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses to OSHA or OSHA's designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than the date listed in paragraph (c) of this section of the year after the calendar year covered by the form.
Upon notification, you must electronically submit the requested information from your part 1904 records to OSHA or OSHA's designee.
No, only two categories of employers must routinely submit information from their injury and illness records. First, if your establishment had 250 or more employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and this part requires your establishment to keep records, then you must submit the required Form 300A, 300, and 301 information to OSHA once a year. Second, if your establishment had 20 or more employees but fewer than 250 employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and your establishment is classified in an industry listed in appendix A to subpart E of this part, then you must submit the required Form 300A information to OSHA once a year. Employers in these two categories must submit the required information by the date listed in paragraph (c) of this section of the year after the calendar year covered by the form or forms (for example, 2017 for the 2016 forms). If you are not in either of these two categories, then you must submit information from the injury and illness records to OSHA only if OSHA notifies you to do so for an individual data collection.
No, you are required to submit all of the information from the form except the following:.
Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (OSHA Form 300): Employee name (column B).
Injury and Illness Incident Report (OSHA Form 301): Employee name (field 1), employee address (field 2), name of physician or other health care professional (field 6), facility name and address if treatment was given away from the worksite (field 7).
Yes, each individual employed in the establishment at any time during the calendar year counts as one employee, including full-time, part-time, seasonal, and temporary workers.
OSHA will notify you by mail if you will have to submit information as part of an individual data collection under paragraph (a)(3). OSHA will also announce individual data collections through publication in the Federal Register and the OSHA newsletter, and announcements on the OSHA Web site. If you are an employer who must routinely submit the information, then OSHA will not notify you about your routine submittal.
If you are required to submit information under paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section, then you must submit the information once a year, by the date listed in paragraph (c) of this section of the year after the calendar year covered by the form or forms. If you are submitting information because OSHA notified you to submit information as part of an individual data collection under paragraph (a)(3) of this section, then you must submit the information as often as specified in the notification.
You must submit the information electronically. OSHA will provide a secure Web site for the electronic submission of information. For individual data collections under paragraph (a)(3) of this section, OSHA will include the Web site's location in the notification for the data collection.
If you are partially exempt from keeping injury and illness records under §§ 1904.1 and/or 1904.2, then you do not have to routinely submit part 1904 information under paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section. You will have to submit information under paragraph (a)(3) of this section if OSHA informs you in writing that it will collect injury and illness information from you. If you receive such a notification, then you must keep the injury and illness records required by this part and submit information as directed.
Yes, the requirements apply to employers located in State Plan States.
Yes, if your enterprise or corporate office had ownership of or control over one or more establishments required to submit information under paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section, then the enterprise or corporate office may collect and electronically submit the information for the establishment(s).
In 2017 and 2018, establishments required to submit under paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section must submit the required information according to the table in this paragraph (c)(1):

Submission year Establishments submitting under paragraph (a)(1) of this section must submit the required information from this form/these forms: Establishments submitting under paragraph (a)(2) of this section must submit the required information from this form: Submission deadline
2017 300A 300A July 1, 2017
2018 300A, 300, 301 300A July 1, 2018
Beginning in 2019, establishments that are required to submit under paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section will have to submit all of the required information by March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form or forms (for example, by March 2, 2019, for the forms covering 2018).

[66 FR 6134, Jan. 19, 2001; 81 FR 29692-29693 May 12, 2016; 82 FR 55765 November 24, 2017]
NAICS Industry
11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting.
22 Utilities.
23 Construction.
31-33 Manufacturing.
42 Wholesale trade.
4413 Automotive parts, accessories, and tire stores.
4421 Furniture stores.
4422 Home furnishings stores.
4441 Building material and supplies dealers.
4442 Lawn and garden equipment and supplies stores.
4451 Grocery stores.
4452 Specialty food stores.
4521 Department stores.
4529 Other general merchandise stores.
4533 Used merchandise stores.
4542 Vending machine operators.
4543 Direct selling establishments.
4811 Scheduled air transportation.
4841 General freight trucking.
4842 Specialized freight trucking.
4851 Urban transit systems.
4852 Interurban and rural bus transportation.
4853 Taxi and limousine service.
4854 School and employee bus transportation.
4855 Charter bus industry.
4859 Other transit and ground passenger transportation.
4871 Scenic and sightseeing transportation, land.
4881 Support activities for air transportation.
4882 Support activities for rail transportation.
4883 Support activities for water transportation.
4884 Support activities for road transportation.
4889 Other support activities for transportation.
4911 Postal service.
4921 Couriers and express delivery services.
4922 Local messengers and local delivery.
4931 Warehousing and storage.
5152 Cable and other subscription programming.
5311 Lessors of real estate.
5321 Automotive equipment rental and leasing.
5322 Consumer goods rental.
5323 General rental centers.
5617 Services to buildings and dwellings.
5621 Waste collection.
5622 Waste treatment and disposal.
5629 Remediation and other waste management services.
6219 Other ambulatory health care services.
6221 General medical and surgical hospitals.
6222 Psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals.
6223 Specialty (except psychiatric and substance abuse) hospitals.
6231 Nursing care facilities.
6232 Residential mental retardation, mental health and substance abuse facilities.
6233 Community care facilities for the elderly.
6239 Other residential care facilities.
6242 Community food and housing, and emergency and other relief services.
6243 Vocational rehabilitation services.
7111 Performing arts companies.
7112 Spectator sports.
7121 Museums, historical sites, and similar institutions.
7131 Amusement parks and arcades.
7132 Gambling industries.
7211 Traveler accommodation.
7212 RV (recreational vehicle) parks and recreational camps.
7213 Rooming and boarding houses.
7223 Special food services.
8113 Commercial and industrial machinery and equipment (except automotive and electronic) repair and maintenance.
8123 Dry-cleaning and laundry services.


[81 FR 29693-29694 May 12, 2016]
If you receive a Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Form from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or a BLS designee, you must promptly complete the form and return it following the instructions contained on the survey form.
No, each year, the BLS sends injury and illness survey forms to randomly selected employers and uses the information to create the Nation's occupational injury and illness statistics. In any year, some employers will receive a BLS survey form and others will not. You do not have to send injury and illness data to the BLS unless you receive a survey form.
If you receive a Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Form from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or a BLS designee, you must promptly complete the form and return it, following the instructions contained on the survey form.
Yes, even if you are exempt from keeping injury and illness records under § 1904.1 to § 1904.3, the BLS may inform you in writing that it will be collecting injury and illness information from you in the coming year. If you receive such a letter, you must keep the injury and illness records required by § 1904.5 to § 1904.15 and make a survey report for the year covered by the survey.
Yes, all employers who receive a survey form must respond to the survey, even those in State-Plan States.

[66 FR 6134, Jan. 19, 2001]
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