Heads up: There are no amended sections in this chapter.
For the purpose of this Code, the following terms shall have the meaning indicated in this chapter. No attempt is made to define ordinary words that are used in accordance with their established dictionary meaning, except where it is necessary to define their meaning as used in this Code to avoid misunderstanding.
Accessible and Readily Accessible:
Accessible: access thereto without damaging building surfaces, but that first may require the removal of an access panel, door or similar obstructions with the use of tools. See Figure 1.2.1
Readily accessible: access without requiring the use of tools for removing or moving any panel, door or similar obstruction. See Figure 1.2.1
Figure 1.2.1
AN EXAMPLE OF ACCESSIBLE AND READILY ACCESSIBLE
Acid Waste: See "Special Wastes"
Air Break (drainage system): A piping arrangement in which a drain from a fixture, appliance, or device discharges into a receptor at an elevation below the flood level rim and above the trap seal of the receptor. See Figure 1.2.2 and Section 9.1.3
Comment: Air breaks are permitted where the waste pipe being drained cannot cause backsiphonage.
Figure 1.2.2
AIR BREAKS
Figure 1.2.3
A WATER HAMMER ARRESTOR
Air Gap (drainage system): The unobstructed vertical distance through the free atmosphere between the outlet of the waste pipe and the flood level rim of the receptor into which it is discharging. See Figure 1.2.4
Comment: Air gaps are required where backflow can occur due to backsiphonage.
Figure 1.2.4
AN AIR GAP FOR INDIRECT WASTE PIPING
Air Gap (water distribution system): The unobstructed vertical distance through the free atmosphere between the lowest opening from any pipe or faucet supplying water to a tank, plumbing fixture, or other device and the flood level rim of the receptor. See Figure 1.2.5
Comment 1: The minimum required air gap distance is based on the effective opening of the water supply outlet. The air gap must be increased if the outlet is close to walls or other vertical surfaces. See Section 10.5.2 and Table 10.5.2
Comment 2: If air is being drawn into the tub spout by a vacuum in the water supply piping, waste water at the flood level of the fixture will tend to be lifted upward towards the spout opening by the flow of air. The water will lift higher if the spout opening is close to a wall.
Figure 1.2.5
AN AIR GAP FOR A POTABLE WATER OUTLET
Approved: Accepted or acceptable under an applicable standard stated or cited in this Code, or accepted as suitable for the proposed use under procedures and powers of the Authority Having Jurisdiction as defined in N.J.A.C. 5:23-3.7. See Sections 3.1.1, 3.1.2, and 3.1.3
Area Drain: A receptor designed to collect surface or storm water from an open area. See Figures 1.2.6 and 13.1.6
Figure 1.2.6
AREA DRAINS IN WINDOW WELLS AND STAIRWELLS
Aspirator: A fitting or device supplied with water or other fluid under positive pressure that passes through an integral orifice or "constriction" causing a vacuum. See Figure 1.2.7 and Section 14.13
Comment: Backflow prevention is required where the fluid supply is potable water.
Figure 1.2.7
AN ASPIRATOR FITTING
Authority Having Jurisdiction: Unless otherwise defined herein, or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, the term "authority having jurisdiction" for purposes of the plumbing subcode, shall mean the "plumbing subcode official."
Automatic Compensating Valve: A temperature control valve for individual shower and tub/shower combinations designed to minimize thermal shock and reduce the risk of scalding. They are installed at the point of use where the user has access to adjust the water flow and discharge temperature. The valves include Type P (pressure balancing), Type T (thermostatic), and Type T/P (combination), and comply with ASSE 1016/ASME A112.1016/CSA B125.16.
Automatic Flushing Device: A device that automatically flushes a fixture after each use without the need for manual activation.
Auxiliary Floor Drain: A floor drain that does not receive the discharge from any indirect waste pipe or other predictable drainage flows. Auxiliary floor drains have no DFU loading.
Backpressure Backflow: Backflow into potable water piping from a source having a higher pressure than in the potable water piping. See Figure 1.2.8
Figure 1.2.8
BACKFLOW CAUSED BY BACK-PRESSURE
Backsiphonage Backflow: Backflow into potable water piping caused by a vacuum or partial vacuum in the potable water piping. See Figure 1.2.9
Figure 1.2.9
BACKFLOW CAUSED BY BACK SIPHONAGE
Backflow Preventer: A device or assembly that prevents backflow into potable water piping caused by backpressure, backsiphonage, or both.
Backwater Valve: A device installed in a drain pipe to prevent reverse flow in the drainage system. See Figure 1.2.10
Comment: Backwater valves are swing-type check valves that are installed in drainage pipe to prevent the reversal of flow in the piping and overflows due to stoppages, flooding, or other abnormal conditions. Refer to Section 5.5.1 for where backwater valves are required.
Figure 1.2.10
A BACKWATER VALVE
Baptistery: A tank or pool for baptizing by total immersion.
Bathroom Group: A group of fixtures in a dwelling unit bathroom consisting of one water closet, one or two lavatories, and either one bathtub, one combination bath/shower or one shower stall. Other fixtures within the bathing facility shall be counted separately when determining the total water supply and drainage fixture loads for the bathroom group.
Bath/Shower Combination: A bathtub or whirlpool bath with shower heads and shower control valves.
Battery of Fixtures: Any group of two or more similar adjacent fixtures that discharge into a common fixture branch drain. See Figure 1.2.11
Comment: Batteries of fixtures can be "battery vented" in groups of up to eight fixtures in accordance with Section 12.13. Fixtures that are "battery vented" do not have to be of the same type.
Figure 1.2.11
A BATTERY OF FIXTURES
Bedpan Steamer: A fixture used for scalding bedpans or urinals by direct application of steam. See Section 14.10
Boiler Blowoff: An outlet on a boiler to permit emptying or discharge of sediment. See Figure 1.2.12
Boiler Blowoff Tank: A vessel designed to receive the discharge from a boiler blowoff outlet and to cool the discharge to a temperature that permits its safe discharge to the drainage system. See Figure 1.2.12
Comment: Boiler blowoff must be cooled to 140°F or less before being discharged into the drainage system. If potable water is supplied for cooling, the water source must be protected from backflow. An air break can be provided at the discharge from the blowoff tank into the drainage system if the make-up water supply to the boiler is protected against backflow.
Figure 1.2.12
A BOILER BLOWOFF TANK
Branch Drain: A branch of drain piping, including horizontal fixture branches, horizontal branch drains, horizontal battery-vented drains, and branches of the building drain.
Branch Interval: A distance along a vertical sanitary drain stack corresponding, in general, to a story height, but in no case less than 8 feet within which the horizontal branches from one floor or story of a building are connected to the stack. See Figure 1.2.14
Comment: Branch intervals are used to determine the potential drainage load on stacks for the purpose of sizing the stacks and providing pressure relief.
Figure 1.2.14
BRANCH INTERVALS
Branch Vent: See "Vent, Branch"
Building Classification: The arrangement for the designation of buildings according to occupancy based on the applicable building subcode at N.J.A.C. 5:23-3.14.
Comment: The building classifications in Table 7.21.1 for the minimum number of required plumbing fixtures include assembly (A), business (B), education (E), factory (F), institutional (I), mercantile (M), residential (R), and storage (S).
Building Drain, Combined: A building drain that conveys both sewage and storm water. See Figure 1.2.15
Figure 1.2.15
COMBINED BUILDING DRAINAGE SYSTEM
Building Drain, Sanitary: The lowest piping in the building sanitary drainage system that receives the discharge from drain stacks, horizontal branch drains, and fixture drains within the building and conveys the sewage to the building sanitary sewer which begins three (3) feet beyond the outside face of the building. See Figure 1.2.16
Figure 1.2.16
SEPARATE SANITARY AND STORM BUILDING DRAINS AND SEWERS
Building Drain, Storm: A building drain that conveys only storm water from the building to the building storm sewer which begins three (3) feet beyond the outside face of the building. See Figure 1.2.16
Building Sewer, Combined: A building sewer that conveys both sewage and storm water. See Figure 1.2.15
Building Sewer, Sanitary: That part of the building sanitary drainage system that extends from the end of the sanitary building drain and conveys the sewage to a public sewer, an individual sewage disposal system, or other point of disposal. The building sanitary sewer begins at a point three (3) feet beyond the outside face of the building. It does not extend beyond any property lines if discharging to an off-site public sewer or off-site point of disposal. See Figure 1.2.16
Building Sewer, Storm: A building sewer that conveys only storm water from the building storm drain to a public storm sewer or other point of disposal. The building storm sewer begins at a point three (3) feet beyond the outside face of the building. It does not extend beyond any property lines if discharging to an off-site public sewer or off-site point of disposal. See Figure 1.2.16
Building Subdrain: That portion of a drainage system that does not drain by gravity into the building drain or building sewer. See Figure 11.7.2
Building Trap: A device, fitting, or assembly of fittings, installed in the building drain to prevent circulation of sewer gas between the building sewer and the drainage system in the building. See Figure 1.2.18
Comment: Building traps are currently installed only when required by the Authority Having Jurisdiction.
Figure 1.2.18
A BUILDING TRAP
Cesspool: A lined and covered excavation in the ground that receives the discharge of domestic sewage or other organic wastes from a drainage system, so designed as to retain the organic matter and solids, but permitting the liquids to seep through the bottom and sides.
Comment: Chapter 16 does not permit cesspools or cesspits, into which untreated sewage is discharged and allowed to seep into the ground. Chapter 16 requires septic tanks to retain the sewage until digested and absorption trenches or seepage pits for underground disposal of the effluent.
Chemical Dispensing System: Equipment that mixes potable water with chemicals to provide the user with a chemical solution that is diluted to a fixed or adjustable amount and is ready for use.
Chemical Waste: Includes industrial liquid waste, process waste, diluted and undiluted acid waste and corrosive and non-corrosive chemical liquid waste. See Sections 2.10, 3.11, and 9.4
Circuit Vent: See "Vent, Circuit" See Figure 12.13.1
Clear Water Waste: Effluent in which impurity levels are less than concentrations considered harmful by the Authority Having Jurisdiction, such as cooling water and condensate drainage from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, cooled condensate from steam heating systems, and residual water from ice making processes.
Comment: Refer to Section 9.1.8 for whether a clear water waste requires an air gap or an air break at its discharge into the drainage system.
Clinical Sink: A sink designed primarily to receive wastes from bedpans, having a flushing rim, integral trap with a visible trap seal, and having the same flushing and cleansing characteristics as a water closet. See Section 14.8
Combination Waste and Vent System: A designed system of waste piping embodying the horizontal wet venting of one or more sinks or floor drains by means of a common waste and vent pipe adequately sized to provide free movement of air above the flow line of the drain. See Figure 1.2.20 and Section 12.17
Comment 1: Combination waste and vent piping systems are permitted where conditions preclude the installation of a conventionally vented system. Such systems are frequently used in exhibition halls and other spaces where long clear spans are required without partitions or pipe chases.
Comment 2: Only floor drains, floor receptors, sinks, lavatories, and standpipes can be discharged into a combination waste and vent piping system.
Figure 1.2.20
COMBINATION WASTE AND VENT PIPING
Combined Building Drain: See "Building Drain, Combined"
Combined Building Sewer: See "Building Sewer, Combined"
Commercial Kitchen: One or more rooms in a building that is licensed to prepare food to be served for consumption or process food to be packaged for distribution.
Common Laundry Room: A laundry facility for personal use by multiple individuals in commercial buildings and buildings having more than two dwelling units.
Common Vent: See "Vent, Common"
Conductor: A pipe within a building that conveys storm water from a roof to its connection to a building storm drain or other point of disposal. See Figure 1.2.21
Comment: A vertical stormwater drain pipe on the exterior of a building is a leader.
Figure 1.2.21
A STORMWATER CONDUCTOR
Contamination (of Potable Water): The impairment of the quality of the potable water that creates a high hazard to the public health through poisoning or through the spread of disease by sewage, industrial fluids or waste. (Refer to the definition of "high hazard").
Continuous Vent: See "Vent, Continuous"
Continuous Waste Piping: Drain piping from two or three adjacent lavatories or sinks that connects them to a single trap. See Figures 1.2.22, 5.1-C, 5.1-D
Comment: Continuous waste piping can connect up to three adjacent sinks or lavatories to a single trap if the fixture outlets are no more than 30" apart. See Section 5.1.
Figure 1.2.22
CONTINUOUS WASTE PIPING
Continuous Water Pressure: With regard to the proper application of backflow preventers, continuous pressure is if they are normally subjected to continuous water supply pressure for periods of more than twelve (12) hours.
Critical Level: The marking on a backflow prevention device or vacuum breaker established by the manufacturer, and usually stamped on the device by the manufacturer, that determines the minimum elevation above the flood level rim of the fixture or receptor served at which the device must be installed. When a backflow prevention device does not bear a critical level marking, the bottom of the vacuum breaker, combination valve, or the bottom of any approved device constitutes its critical level. See Figure 1.2.23 and Sections 10.5.5.b, c, and e
Figure 1.2.23
THE CRITICAL LEVEL (C-L) OF A VACUUM BREAKER
Cross Connection: Any connection or arrangement between two otherwise separate piping systems, one of which contains potable water and the other either water of questionable safety, steam, gas, or chemical, whereby there may be a flow from one system to the other, the direction of flow depending on the pressure differential between the two systems. (See "Backflow and Backsiphonage). See Figures 1.2.8 and 1.2.9
Comment: The backflow of contamination into a potable water system through a cross connection can occur by backsiphonage caused by the water system or backpressure from the source of contamination.
Crown Venting: Where the distance between the opening of the vent pipe for a fixture is less than two (2) drain pipe diameters from the crown weir of the trap. See Figures 1.2.62 and 5.3.5
CTS: An abbreviation for "copper tube size".
Dead End: Inactive drain or vent piping that does not perform a function in the plumbing system.
Developed Length of Piping: The length of a pipe line measured along the center line of the piping and its fittings. Where pipe sizing tables are based on only the developed length of pipe, verify that there has been an allowance for an equivalent pipe length of the fittings.
DFU: See "Fixture Unit (Drainage — DFU)"
DIPS: An abbreviation for "ductile iron pipe size".
Domestic Sewage: Sanitary sewage from assembly, business, educational, institutional, mercantile, and residential facilities. Not industrial or storm water drainage.
Double Check Valve Assembly: A backflow prevention device consisting of two independently acting check valves, internally force loaded to a normally closed position between two tightly closing shut-off valves, and with means of testing for tightness. See Figure 1.2.25
Figure 1.2.25
A DOUBLE CHECK VALVE ASSEMBLY
Double Offset: See "Offset, Double"
DR: An abbreviation for the "dimension ratio" of OD controlled plastic pipe that is based on the ratio of the outside diameter of the pipe divided by its minimum wall thickness. Lower DR ratings of the same pipe design and material have higher pressure ratings.
Comment: DR equals SDR for the same pipe material composition (designation code) with the same outside diameter and minimum wall thickness. The terms are used interchangeably depending on the pipe manufacturer or standards organization. Pipes of the same material composition with the same DR and SDR have the same pressure ratings regardless of pipe size.
Drain Stack: Vertical drain piping, with or without offsets, that conveys drainage from horizontal drain piping to a lower floor elevation. Drain stacks do not include vertical drain piping from an individual fixture, a wet vented water closet, or a bathroom group that is not more than one story height. Drain stacks require a stack vent.
Dry Vent: See "Vent, Dry"
Dry Well: See "Leaching Well"
Dual Vent: See "Vent, Common"
Dwelling Unit, Multiple: A room, or group of rooms, forming a single habitable unit with facilities that are used, or intended to be used, for living, sleeping, cooking, and eating. Its sewer connections and water supply, within its own premise, are shared with one or more other dwelling units. Multiple dwelling units include apartments, condominiums, and hotel and motel guest rooms.
Dwelling Unit, Single: Rooms forming a single habitable unit with facilities that are used, or intended to be used, for living, sleeping, cooking, and eating. Its sewer connections and water supply are, within its own premise, separate from and completely independent of any other dwelling unit.
DWV: An abbreviation for "drain-waste-vent" referring to sanitary drainage, waste, and venting systems. The term is equivalent to "soil-waste-vent" (SWV).
Effective Opening: The cross-sectional area at the point of water supply discharge, measured or expressed in terms of (1) diameter of a circle, or (2) if the opening is not circular, the diameter of a circle of equivalent cross-sectional area. See Figures 1.2.26
Comment: The required air gap distance for a water supply outlet is based on its effective opening. The air gap must be increased if the outlet is near a wall or other vertical surface. Refer to Table 10.5.2 for minimum air gaps for plumbing fixtures.
Figure 1.2.26
THE EFFECTIVE OPENING OF A POTABLE WATER OUTLET
Equivalent Length of Fittings and Valves: The equivalent length of straight pipe that would produce the same resistance to flow as a specific fitting or valve of the same pipe size.
Equivalent Length of Pipe, Fittings, and Valves or Total Equivalent Length: The sum of the developed lengths of piping in a pipe line and the equivalent lengths of the fittings and valves in that line.
Existing Plumbing System: A plumbing system, or any part thereof, that has been installed, was complete, and accepted by the Authority Having Jurisdiction for the adopted edition of the plumbing code under which its permit was issued.
Fixture: See "Plumbing Fixture"
Fixture Branch Drain: A branch drain that receives the discharge from two or more fixture drains.
Comment: See Table 11.5.1B for the maximum number of drainage fixture units (DFU) permitted on each size of horizontal fixture branch.
Fixture Drain: The drain from the trap of a fixture to the junction of that drain with any other drain pipe.
Fixture Supply Branch: A branch of the water distribution system supplying one fixture. See Figure 1.2.29
Comment: See Table 10.14.2A for minimum fixture supply branch pipe sizes for various fixtures.
Figure 1.2.29
A FIXTURE SUPPLY BRANCH AND FIXTURE SUPPLY TUBE
Fixture Unit (Drainage - DFU): An index number that represents the load of a fixture on the drainage system so that the load of various fixtures in various applications can be combined. The value is based on the volume or volume rate of drainage discharge from the fixture, the time duration of that discharge, and the average time between successive uses of the fixture. See Table 11.4.1
Fixture Unit (Water Supply - WSFU): An index number that represents the load of a fixture on the water supply system so that the load of various fixtures in various applications can be combined. The value is based on the volume rate of supply for the fixture, the time duration of a single supply operation, and the average time between successive uses of the fixture. See Table 10.14.2A. Also Tables B.5.2 and B.5.3.
Flexible Water Connector: A connector under continuous pressure in an accessible location that connects a supply fitting, faucet, dishwasher, cloths washer, water heater, water treatment unit, or other fixture or equipment to a stop valve or its water supply branch pipe.
Flood Level Rim: The edge of the receptor or fixture over which water flows if the fixture is flooded. See Figure 1.2.30
Figure 1.2.30
THE FLOOD LEVEL RIM OF FIXTURES
Flow Pressure: The pressure in the water supply pipe near the faucet or water outlet while the faucet or water outlet is fully open and flowing. See Figure 1.2.31
Comment: The minimum required flowing water pressure for most fixtures and appliances is 15 psig. Blowout water closets and blowout urinals require 25 psig minimum. Some one-piece water closets require 30 psig minimum and 1/2" supply tubes
Figure 1.2.31
THE FLOW PRESSURE OF THE WATER SUPPLY TO AN OUTLET
Flush Pipes and Fittings: The pipe and fittings that connect a flushometer valve or elevated flush tank to a water closet, urinal, or bedpan washer.
Flushing Type Floor Drain: A floor drain that is equipped with an integral water supply connection, enabling flushing of the drain trap. See Figure 1.2.32
Comment: The water supply to flushing floor drains must be protected from backflow.
Figure 1.2.32
A FLUSHING TYPE FLOOR DRAIN
Flush Valve: A device located in a water closet flush tank for flushing water closets and similar fixtures. See Figure 1.2.33
Figure 1.2.33
A FLUSH VALVE IN A WATER CLOSET FLUSH TANK
Flushometer Tank: A water closet flush tank that uses an air accumulator vessel to discharge a predetermined quantity of water into the closet bowl for flushing purposes. See Figure 1.2.34
Comment: Flushometer tanks are pressure-assisted flush tanks that store water for flushing water closets at the inlet water supply pressure, as opposed to gravity tanks. The discharge rate from flushometer tanks is approximately 35 gallons per minute.
Figure 1.2.34
A PRESSURE-ASSISTED WATER CLOSET WITH A FLUSHOMETER TANK
Flushometer Valve: A device that discharges a predetermined quantity of water to fixtures for flushing and is closed by direct water pressure or other means. See Figure 1.2.35
Comment: Flushometer valves are typically used on public water closets and public urinals. They can be manually operated or electronically operated.
Figure 1.2.35
A FLUSHOMETER VALVE
FOG: The abbreviation for fats, oil, and grease in the waste drainage from food handling facilities.
Force Main: A main that delivers waste water under pressure from a sewage ejector or pump to its destination.
Foundation Drain: A drainage system installed near the footings under foundation walls to drain ground water away from the foundation walls to prevent water leakage into building spaces below grade.
Full-way valve: Full-way valves include gate valves, full port ball valves, and other valves that are identified by their manufacturer as full port or full bore.
GGI: The abbreviation for "gravity grease interceptor".
GPF: The abbreviation for the rated "gallons per flush" for water closets and urinals.
Grade: The fall (slope) of a line of pipe in reference to a horizontal plane. See Figure 1.2.36
Comment: See Table 11.5.1A for sizing sloping building drains, branches of the building drain, and building sewers. See Table 13.6.2 for sizing sloping stormwater drains.
Figure 1.2.36
GRADE ON A SLOPING GRAVITY DRAIN
Graywater: Wastewater from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, and clothes washers that is collected and stored for use as non-potable water in the same facility.
Grease Interceptor: A plumbing appurtenance that is installed in the sanitary drainage system to intercept oily and greasy wastes from wastewater discharges typically in commercial kitchens and food processing plants. Such equipment has the ability to intercept commonly occurring free-floating fats and oils.
Grease Removal Device (GRD): A plumbing appurtenance that is installed in the sanitary drainage system to intercept and remove free-floating fats, oils, and grease from wastewater discharges typically in commercial kitchens and food processing plants. Such equipment operates on a time or event-controlled basis and has the ability to remove the entire range of commonly occurring free-floating fats, oils, and grease automatically without intervention from the user except for maintenance. The removed material is essentially water-free, which allows for recycling of the removed product.
Grease Trap: See "Interceptor"
GRD: The abbreviation for "grease removal device", a type of grease interceptor.
Grinder Pump: A pump for sewage that shreds or grinds the solids in the sewage that it pumps.
Ground Water: Subsurface water occupying a zone of saturation.
Confined ground water - a body of ground water overlaid by material sufficiently impervious to prevent free hydraulic connection with overlying ground water.
Free ground water - ground water in the zone of saturation extending down to the first impervious barrier.
Half-Bath: A room that contains one water closet and one lavatory within a dwelling unit.
Harvested Rainwater: Rainwater from the roof of a building that is collected and stored for use as non-potable water in the same facility.
HGI: The abbreviation for "hydromechanical grease interceptor".
High Hazard: A condition in the plumbing system that could contaminate the supply and distribution of potable water if not protected by the necessary backflow prevention.
Horizontal Battery-Vented Drain: A horizontal drain that connects battery-vented fixtures to a drain stack, the building drain, or a branch of the building drain.
Horizontal Branch Drain: Horizontal drain piping, with or without offsets, that receives the discharge from two or more fixture drains and conveys the drainage to the building drain or a branch of the building drain. Horizontal branch drains do not connect to drain stacks.
Horizontal Fixture Branch: Horizontal drain piping, with or without offsets, that receives the discharge from two or more fixture drains and conveys the drainage to a vertical drain stack with the reduced allowable DFU loading for the branch as indicated in Table 11.5.1B.
Comment: The reduced DFU loading for the branch is to prevent the branch flow from impacting the flow in the stack, causing turbulence in the stack and restricted flow in the branch.
Horizontal Pipe: Any pipe or fitting that makes an angle of less than 45° with the horizontal. See Figure 1.2.37
Comment: The sizing of offsets in drain stacks varies depending on whether the offset is horizontal or vertical. See Section 11.6.
Figure 1.2.37
THE DEFINITION OF "HORIZONTAL PIPE"
Hot Water: Potable water that is heated for domestic use including bathing, washing, dishwashing, clothes washing, cleaning, and maintenance. Hot Water is potable water at a temperature of not less than 120 degrees F. and not more than 140 degrees F.
IDR: An abbreviation for the "dimension ratio" of ID controlled plastic pipe that is based on the ratio of the inside diameter of the pipe divided by its minimum wall thickness. Lower IDR ratings of the same pipe design and material have higher pressure ratings.
Comment: IDR equals SIDR for the same pipe material composition (designation code) with the same inside diameter and minimum wall thickness. The terms are used interchangeably depending on the pipe manufacturer or standards organization. Pipes of the same material composition with the same IDR and SIDR have the same pressure ratings regardless of pipe size.
Indirect Connection (Waste): The introduction of waste into the drainage system by means of an air gap or air break.
Indirect Waste Pipe: A waste pipe that does not connect directly with the drainage system, but which discharges into the drainage system through an air break or air gap into a trap, fixture, receptor or interceptor. See Figure 1.2.38
Figure 1.2.38
INDIRECT WASTE PIPES
Individual Vent: See "Vent, Individual"
Industrial Wastes: Liquid or liquid-borne wastes resulting from the processes employed in industrial and commercial establishments.
Comment: Industrial wastes must not be discharged into public sewers if they will damage the sewer or interfere with the operation of the sewage treatment plant.
Interceptor: A device designed and installed so as to separate and retain deleterious, hazardous, or undesirable matter from normal wastes while permitting normal sewage or liquid wastes to discharge into the drainage system by gravity. See Figure 1.2.39
Comment: Interceptors include grease interceptors, oil/water separators, sand interceptors, solids interceptors, and neutralizing or dilution tanks.
Figure 1.2.39
AN INTERCEPTOR
Invert: The lowest portion of the inside of a horizontal pipe. See Figure 1.2.40
Comment: Invert elevations are used to design and install drainage pipe at the required grade or slope.
Figure 1.2.40
THE INVERT OF A DRAIN PIPE
IPS: An abbreviation for "iron pipe size".
Leaching Well or Pit: A pit or receptor having porous walls that permit the liquid contents to seep into the ground. See Figure 1.2.41
Comment: Leaching wells or pits are used to disperse the effluent from septic tanks into the ground for secondary treatment. They may supplement or be used in lieu of absorption trenches. Leaching wells or pits can only be used where there is very deep soil of good permeability and considerable depth to groundwater.
Figure 1.2.41
A LEECHING OR SEEPAGE WELL OR PIT
Lead Content: Materials used in potable water supply systems, including piping, faucets, and valves, shall be "lead-free" as defined by current Federal Law. Drinking water system components shall comply with the lead leachate requirements of NSF 61. Refer to Section 3.1.5 for components that are within the scope of NSF 61.
Leader: An exterior vertical drain pipe for conveying stormwater from roof or gutter drains. See Figure 1.2.42
Figure 1.2.42
A STORMWATER LEADER
Loop Vent: See "Vent, Loop"
Low Hazard: A condition in the plumbing system that could pollute the supply and distribution of potable water if not protected by the necessary backflow prevention.
Macerating Toilet System: A system that collects drainage from a single water closet, lavatory and/or bathtub located in the same room. It consists of a receiving container, a grinder pump, and associated level controls. The system pumps shredded or macerated sewage up to a point of discharge.
May: The word "may" is a permissive term.
Medical Gas System: The complete system used to convey medical gases for direct application from central supply systems (bulk tanks, manifolds and medical air compressors) through piping networks with pressure and operating controls, alarm warning systems, etc., and extending to station outlet valves at use points.
Medical Vacuum Systems: A system consisting of central vacuum producing equipment with pressure and operating controls, shut-off valves, alarm warning systems, gauges and a network of piping extending to and terminating with suitable station inlets at locations where vacuum may be required.
Non-Potable Water: Water not safe for drinking, personal or culinary use.
Nominal Size: (Pipe or Tube): The industry-recognized size of a plumbing pipe or tube that is not necessarily an actual dimension. It indicates the size of the pipe or tube as indicated in its material standard listed in Table 3.1.3.
Offset: A combination of elbows or bends that brings one section of the pipe out of line but into a line parallel with the other section. See Figure 1.2.44 — Parts A and B for single offsets
Comment: Offsets can occur in vertical and horizontal piping. Offsets can consist of 90-degree, 45-degree, or other angle fittings. Single offsets have one change of alignment.
Offset, Double: Two offsets installed in succession or series in a continuous pipe. See Figure 1.2.44 — Parts E and F
Comment: Double offsets have two offsets, both away from the original alignment of the pipe.
Offset, Return: A double offset installed so as to return the pipe to its original alignment. See Figure 1.2.44 — Parts C and D
Comment: Return offsets have two offsets, both in different directions. The second offset does not necessarily bring the pipeline back into exact alignment with the first. The alignment of the piping on both sides of the offset is not necessarily exactly the same.
Figure 1.2.44
OFFSETS IN PIPING
Oil Interceptor: See "Interceptor"
Pitch: See "Grade"
Plenum: An enclosed portion of the building structure, other than an occupiable space being conditioned, that is designed to allow air movement, and thereby serve as part of an air distribution system.
Plumbing: The practice, materials, and fixtures within or adjacent to any building structure or conveyance, used in the installation, maintenance, extension, alteration and removal of piping, plumbing fixtures, plumbing appliances, and plumbing appurtenances in connection with any of the following:
  1. Sanitary drainage system and its related vent system
  2. Storm water drainage facilities
  3. Public or private potable water supply systems
  4. The initial connection to a potable water supply upstream of any required backflow prevention devices and the final connection that discharges indirectly into a public or private disposal system
  5. Medical gas and medical vacuum systems
  6. Indirect waste piping including refrigeration and air conditioning drainage
  7. Liquid waste or sewage and water supply of any premises to their connection with an approved water supply system or to an acceptable disposal facility
  8. Reclaimed water piping
  9. Graywater systems
  10. Harvested rainwater systems
NOTE: The following are excluded from the definition of plumbing:
  1. All piping, equipment or material used exclusively for environmental control.
  2. Piping used for the incorporation of liquids or gases into any product or process for use in the manufacturing or storage of any product, including product development.
  3. Piping used for the installation, alteration, repair or removal of automatic sprinkler systems installed for fire protection only.
  4. The related appurtenances or standpipes connected to automatic sprinkler systems or overhead or underground fire lines beginning at a point where water is used exclusively for fire protection.
  5. Piping used for lawn sprinkler systems downstream from backflow prevention devices.
Plumbing Appliance: A removable device that; (1) performs a specific domestic function in a facility, (2) is provided for use by the occupants, and (3) requires a water supply and/or drainage connection to the plumbing system.
Comment: Plumbing appliances include clothes washers, dishwashers, ice makers, and coffee machines. Refer to Table 3.1.3 - Part VII for listed plumbing appliances.
Plumbing Appurtenance: A manufactured device, a prefabricated assembly, or an on-the-job assembly of component parts, that is an adjunct to the basic piping system and plumbing fixtures. An appurtenance demands no additional water supply, nor does it add any discharge load to a fixture or to the drainage system. It is presumed that an appurtenance performs some useful function in the operation, maintenance, servicing, economy, or safety of the plumbing system.
Comment: Some examples of plumbing appurtenances are water filters, backflow prevention devices, backwater valves, interceptors, separators, and neutralizing or dilution tanks. Refer to Table 3.1.3 - Part VIII for listed appurtenances. Plumbing appurtenances do not change the load on the water supply or drainage system.
Plumbing Code: These regulations and any deletions, modifications, and additions made by the Adopting Agency.
Plumbing Equipment: A fixed, pipe-connected plumbing device that performs a specific operational function in the performance of a plumbing system.
Comment: Plumbing equipment includes food waste disposers, commercial warewashers, water softeners, and water heaters. Refer to Table 3.1.3 — Part VII for listed plumbing equipment.
Plumbing Fixture: A plumbing device or combination of devices in a facility that; (1) is installed for personal use by the occupants, (2) requires water supply and/or drainage, (3) is pipe-connected to the plumbing system, and (4) is a fixed, functional part of the facility.
Comment: Plumbing fixtures include water closets (toilets), urinals, bidets, lavatories, bathtubs, whirlpool baths, showers, bath/shower combinations, wash fountains, kitchen sinks, laundry sinks, service sinks, specialty sinks, emergency showers, hose bibbs, sill cocks, yard hydrants, and drinking fountains. Refer to Table 3.1.3 - Part V for listed plumbing fixtures.
Plumbing System: Includes the water supply and distribution piping, plumbing fixtures and traps, drain and vent piping, sanitary and storm drains and building sewers, including their respective connections, devices and appurtenances within the property lines of its site.
Pollution (of Potable Water): An impairment of the quality of the potable water to a degree that does not create a high hazard to public health but that does adversely affect the aesthetic qualities of the potable water for domestic use. (Refer to the definition of "low hazard").
Potable Water: Water free from impurities present in amounts sufficient to cause disease or harmful physiological effects and conforming in its bacteriological and chemical quality to the requirements of the Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards or the regulations of the public health authority having jurisdiction.
Powder Room: See "Half-Bath"
Press-Connect Fitting: A permanent mechanical connection for joining metallic tubing utilizing an elastomeric seal or elastomeric seal with corrosion-resistant grip ring or rings. Fitting connections are made by mechanically compressing the wall of the fitting end over the tube utilizing a pressing tool and jaws or press rings approved by the fitting manufacturer.
Pressure Assisted Water Closet: See "Water Closet, Pressure Assisted"
Pressure Balancing Compensating Valve: An automatic compensating valve that senses its incoming hot and cold water pressures and compensates for fluctuations in order to stabilize its adjusted outlet water temperature. See "Automatic Compensating Valve".
Private Sewage Disposal System: A system for disposal of domestic sewage by means of a septic tank or mechanical treatment, designed for use apart from a public sewer to serve a single establishment or building. See Chapter 16
Private Use, Public Use:
Private Use - Plumbing facilities for the private and restricted use of one or more individuals in dwelling units (including hotel and motel guest rooms) and other plumbing facilities that are not intended for public use. Refer to the definition of "Public Use".
Public Use - Plumbing facilities intended for the unrestricted use of more than one individual (including employees) in assembly occupancies, business occupancies, public buildings, transportation facilities, schools and other educational facilities, office buildings, restaurants, bars, other food service facilities, mercantile facilities, manufacturing facilities, military facilities, and other plumbing installations that are not intended for private use. Refer to the definition of "Private Use".
Private Water Supply: A supply, other than an approved public water supply, which serves one or more buildings. See Figure 1.2.46 and Chapter 17
Figure 1.2.46
A TYPICAL PRIVATE WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM
Property Line: The recorded boundary of a plot of land.
PS: An abbreviation for the relative "pipe stiffness" of plastic pipe that is based on the ratio of wall thickness, mean radius, and flexural modulus of elasticity. Higher PS ratings of the same pipe design and material represent stiffer pipe.
Public Toilet Room: Toilet facilities that are intended for public use in accordance with the definition of "Private Use, Public Use".
Public Use: See "Private Use, Public Use".
Pump Assisted Water Closet: See "Water Closet, Pump Assisted".
Push-Fit Fitting: A type of mechanical joint used with copper, CPVC, and PEX that is either permanent or removable and may be used separately or integrated into plumbing fitting devices used in domestic or commercial applications in potable water distribution systems.
Radon Gas: A colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive, and chemically inert gas that is naturally produced in the ground through the normal decay of uranium, which decays to radium, which then decays to radon.
Readily Accessible: See "Accessible and Readily Accessible"
Receptor: A fixture or device which receives the discharge from indirect waste pipes. See Figure 1.2.47
Figure 1.2.47
AN INDIRECT WASTE RECEPTOR
Reclaimed Non-Potable Water: Effluent from a wastewater treatment facility that complies with the requirements of the Authority Having Jurisdiction for reuse as non-potable water for flushing water closets, urinals, landscape irrigation, and other approved uses.
Reduced Pressure Backflow Preventer Assembly: A backflow prevention assembly with shutoff valves consisting of two independently acting check valves, internally force loaded to a closed position and separated by an intermediate chamber (or zone) in which there is an automatic relief means of venting to atmosphere, internally loaded to a normally open position, and with means for testing for tightness of the checks and opening of the relief means. See Figure 1.2.48
Comment: Reduced pressure principle preventers provide the highest level of protection against backpressure and backsiphonage. The shutoff valves on these assemblies are resiliently seated to assure tight close-off for testing and repairing. Provisions must be made to drain any discharge from the relief vent outlet, which may occur due to normal variations in system pressure.
Figure 1.2.48
A REDUCED PRESSURE BACKFLOW PREVENTER ASSEMBLY
Relief Vent: See "Vent, Relief"
Riser, Water Supply: A water supply pipe that extends vertically one full story or more with branches to convey water to plumbing fixtures and water-supplied equipment. See Figure 1.2.49
Figure 1.2.49
A WATER SUPPLY RISER
Roof Drain: A drain installed to receive rainwater collecting on the surface of a roof and to discharge it into a conductor or leader. See Figure 1.2.50
Comment: Roof drains include flat deck drains and scupper drains.
Figure 1.2.50
A GENERAL PURPOSE ROOF DRAIN
Rough Plumbing: The installation of all parts of the plumbing system that can be completed prior to the installation of fixtures. This includes drainage, water supply, and vent piping, and the necessary fixture supports, or any fixtures that are built into the structure.
Sand Filter: A treatment device or structure, constructed above or below the surface of the ground, for removing solid or colloidal material of a type that cannot be removed by sedimentation from septic tank effluent. See Figure 1.2.51 and Section 16.12
Comment: Sand filters provide additional treatment of septic tank effluent. They are used where the soil depth is shallow and cannot provide sufficient secondary treatment of the effluent.
Figure 1.2.51
A SAND FILTER FOR SEPTIC TANK EFFLUENT
Sand Interceptor: "See "Interceptor" and Section 6.4."
Comment: Sand interceptors (or sand traps) are associated with oil/water separators in Chapter 6.
Sanitary Sewer: A system of public or private drain piping or conduits that convey sewage from one or more properties to a point of treatment or disposal.
SDR: An abbreviation for the "standard dimension ratio" of OD controlled plastic pipe that is based on the ratio of the outside diameter of the pipe divided by its minimum wall thickness. Lower SDR ratings of the same pipe design and material have higher pressure ratings.
Comment: SDR equals DR for the same pipe material composition (designation code) with the same outside diameter and minimum wall thickness. The terms are used interchangeably depending on the pipe manufacturer or standards organization. Pipes of the same material composition with the same SDR and DR have the same pressure ratings regardless of pipe size.
Seepage Well or Pit: See "Leaching Well or Pit"
Self-draining: With regard to dead ends in vent piping, piping that will drain by gravity and not retain waste or sewage if its associated drainage piping is functioning normally.
Septic Tank: A watertight receptacle that receives the discharge of a building sanitary drainage system or part thereof; and that is designed and constructed so as to separate solids from the liquid, digest organic matter through a period of detention, and allow the liquids to discharge into the soil outside of the tank through a system of open joint or perforated piping, or a seepage pit. See Figure 1.2.52 and Section 16.6
Comment: Figure 1.2.52 shows baffles at the inlet and outlet connections with two access covers.
Figure 1.2.52
A TYPICAL SEPTIC TANK
Service Sink: A sink or receptor intended for custodial use that is capable of being used to fill and empty a janitor's bucket. Included are mop basins, laundry sinks, utility sinks, and similar fixtures. See Table 7.21.1
Sewage: Liquid discharged into the plumbing drainage system from a fixture, appliance, or other connection that contains urine and/or fecal matter.
Sewage Ejector, Pneumatic Type: A unit that uses compressed air to discharge and lift sewage to a gravity sewage system. See Sections 11.7 and 12.14.3
Sewage Pump or Pump-Type Ejector: A non-clog or grinder-type sewage pump or ejector. Sewage pumps and pump-type ejectors are either the submersible or vertical type. See Figure 1.2.54 and Section 11.7
Comment: Figure 1.2.54 shows a pedestal-type sewage pump. Sewage pumps can also be submersible pumps or dry pit centrifugal pumps.
Figure 1.2.54
A PEDESTAL TYPE SEWAGE PUMP
Shall: "Shall" is a mandatory term.
Short Term: A period of time not more than 30 minutes.
Shut-off Valve: A gate, ball, plug, butterfly, or other full-way valve used to shut off the flow in a pipe.
SIDR: An abbreviation for the "standard inside dimension ratio" of ID controlled plastic pipe that is based on the inside diameter of the pipe divided by its minimum wall thickness. Lower SIDR ratings of the same pipe design and material have higher pressure ratings.
Comment: SIDR equals IDR for the same pipe material composition (designation code) with the same inside diameter and minimum wall thickness. The terms are used interchangeably depending on the pipe manufacturer or standards organization. Pipes of the same material composition with the same SIDR and IDR have the same pressure ratings regardless of pipe size.
Sink, Commercial: A sink other than for a domestic application. Commercial sinks include, but are not limited to:
  1. pot sinks
  2. scullery sinks
  3. sinks used in photographic or other processes
  4. laboratory sinks
Size of Pipe and Tubing, Incremental: Where relative size requirements are mentioned, the following schedule of sizes is recognized, even if all sizes may not be available commercially: 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 3/4, 1, 1-1/4, 1-1/2, 2, 2-1/2, 3, 3-1/2, 4, 4-1/2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24.
Slip Joint: A connection in drainage pipe consisting of a compression nut with a compression washer or ground joint compression ring that permits drainage tubing to be inserted into the joint and secured by tightening the compression nut. Slip joints are typically used in trap connections for lavatories, sinks, and bathtubs. They permit the trap to be removed for cleaning or replacement, and to provide access to the drainage pipe.
Slope: See "Grade"
Soil Pipe: A drain pipe that conveys sewage.
Special Wastes: Wastes that require special treatment before entry into the normal plumbing system.
See Figures 1.2.55 and 9.4.1. Also Section 9.4
Comment: Figure 1.2.55 shows a neutralizing tank for acid waste using limestone or marble chips. Figure 9.4.1 shows an automatic neutralizing tank that could treat either acid or caustic wastes, depending on the neutralizing solution used.
Figure 1.2.55
A NEUTRALIZING OR DILUTION TANK FOR SPECIAL WASTE
Special Waste Pipe: Pipes which convey special wastes. See Section 3.11 for acceptable piping materials.
Stack: Vertical drain piping and vent piping, with or without offsets, that serves multiple fixtures on two or more story heights.
Stack Vent: The extension of the top of a drain stack to a vent header or outdoor vent terminal. See Figure 12.3.1
Standpipe (indirect waste receptor): A vertical drain pipe that has an open top inlet that provides an air break or air gap for indirect waste discharge.
Storm Drain: A drain that conveys only storm water.
Storm Sewer: An underground drain that conveys only rainwater, surface water, and ground water.
Storm Water: Rainwater, surface water, and ground water.
Sump: A tank or pit that receives only liquid wastes, located below the elevation of a gravity discharge, that is emptied by pumping.
Sump, Drainage (sewage): A liquid and air-tight tank that receives sewage and/or liquid waste, located below the elevation of a gravity drainage system, that is emptied by pumping. See Figure 1.2.54
TAFR: The abbreviation for ASSE 1062 temperature actuated flow reduction valves, which provide protection from scalding for individual plumbing supply fittings.
Tempered Water: A mixture of hot and cold water to reach a temperature of 95°F - 105°F.
Thermostatic Compensating Valve: An automatic compensating valve that senses its outlet water temperature and compensates for fluctuations to stabilize its adjusted outlet water temperature. See "Automatic Compensating Valve".
Thermostatic/Pressure Balancing Combination Compensating Valve: An automatic compensating valve that senses its outlet water temperature and its incoming hot and cold water pressures and compensates for fluctuations to stabilize its adjusted outlet water temperature. See "Automatic Compensating Valve".
Toilet Facility: A room or combination of interconnected spaces in other than a dwelling that contains one or more water closets and associated lavatories, with signage to identify its intended use.
Trap: A fitting or device that provides a liquid seal to prevent the emission of sewer gasses without materially affecting the flow of sewage or waste water through it. See Figure 1.2.62 and Sections 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3.
Figure 1.2.62
ELEMENTS OF A FIXTURE TRAP
Trap Arm: That portion of a fixture drain between a trap and its vent. See Figure 1.2.63
Comment: Refer to Table 12.8.1 for the maximum allowable length of trap arms to avoid trap siphonage.
Figure 1.2.63
THE LENGTH OF A TRAP ARM
Trap Primer: A device complying with ASSE 1018 or ASSE 1044 to maintain a water seal in a trap. See Figures 1.2.64 and 1.2.65. Also Section 7.16.2 c & d
Figure 1.2.64
A FLOW-ACTIVATED TRAP PRIMER
Figure 1.2.65
CONNECTION OF A TRAP PRIMER TO A TRAP
Trap Seal: The maximum vertical depth of liquid that a trap will retain, measured between the crown weir and the top of the dip of the trap. See Figure 1.2.62 and Section 5.3.2
Tub/Shower: A bathtub, shower, bath/shower combination, or whirlpool bath.
Vacuum Assisted Water Closet: See "Water Closet, Vacuum Assisted".
Vacuum Breaker, Atmospheric Type: A vacuum breaker that is not designed to be subject to continuous line pressure.
Vacuum Breaker, Pressure Type: A vacuum breaker assembly designed to operate under continuous line pressure. See Figure 1.2.67
Figure 1.2.67
A PRESSURE TYPE VACUUM BREAKER
Vacuum Breaker, Spill-resistant (SVB): A pressure-type vacuum breaker specifically designed to avoid spillage during operation, consisting of one check valve force-loaded closed and an air inlet vent valve force-loaded open to atmosphere, positioned downstream of the check valve, located between two shutoff valves, and including a means for testing.
Comment: SVB vacuum breakers are spill-resistant, not spill-proof.
Vacuum Relief Valve: A device to prevent vacuum in a pressure vessel. See Section 10.16.7
Vent, Branch: A vent connecting vents from two or more fixtures. See Figure 1.2.70
Figure 1.2.70
A BRANCH VENT
Vent, Circuit: The vent for a group of battery-vented fixtures that is connected to their horizontal drain branch between the first two upstream fixtures and extends to a vent stack or other vertical vent. See Figure 1.2.71
Figure 1.2.71
A CIRCUIT VENT
Vent, Common: A continuous vent serving two fixtures that have a common drain. See Figure 1.2.72
>
Figure 1.2.72
A COMMON VENT
Vent, Continuous: A vertical vent that is a continuation of the drain to which it connects. See Figure 1.2.73
Figure 1.2.73
A CONTINUOUS VENT
Vent, Dry: A vent that does not receive the discharge of any sewage or waste.
Vent Header: Vent piping that connects two or more stack vents or vent stacks to an outdoor vent terminal.
Vent, Individual: A pipe, other than a continuous vent, installed to vent a single fixture drain. See Figure 1.2.74
Figure 1.2.74
A INDIVIDUAL VENT
Vent, Local: Vent piping for clinical sinks and bedpan washers that extends to the outdoors above the roof without connection of vapor vents from sterilizers or other vent piping.
Vent, Loop: A circuit vent that loops back and connects to its stack vent instead of its vent stack. See Figures 1.2.75 and 12.13.1
Figure 1.2.75
A LOOP VENT
Vent, Relief: An auxiliary vent that is required for each ten branch intervals of a drain stack. Refer to Section 12.3.2. See Figures 1.2.78 and 12.3.2
Vent Riser: A vertical vent pipe with connections from fixture vents, branch vents, and circuit vents on different floor levels that connects to a stack vent, vent stack, or outdoor vent terminal. Not a vent stack.
Vent Stack: A vertical pipe that is connected to the base of a drain stack having five or more branch intervals. It extends up and connects to the stack vent or an outdoor vent terminal to relieve the pressure at the base of the drain stack. It is sized according to Section 12.16.4. See Figure 12.3.1
Vent, Sterilizer: A separate pipe or stack, indirectly drained to the building drainage system that receives the vapors from non-pressure sterilizers, or the exhaust vapors from pressure sterilizers, and conducts the vapors directly to the outside air. Sometimes called vapor, steam, atmosphere, or exhaust vent. See Section 14.11
Vent, Vapor: See "Vent, Sterilizer".
Vent, Wet: A vent pipe that is sized and arranged in accordance with this Code to receive the discharge of waste from a fixture. See Figure 1.2.77. Refer to Section 12.10 for other arrangements of wet venting.
Figure 1.2.77
A WET VENT
Vent, Yoke: A vertical vent pipe that connects up to ten branch intervals of a drain stack to its vent stack to relieve the pressure in the drain stack. See Figure 1.2.78 and Section 12.3.2
Comment: A yoke vent is vertical. No portion of a yoke vent can be horizontal.
Figure 1.2.78
A YOKE VENT
Vertical Pipe: Any pipe or fitting that makes an angle of 45° or more with the horizontal. See Figure 1.2.79
Figure 1.2.79
THE DEFINITION OF "VERTICAL PIPE"
Wash Fountain: A large circular or semi-circular sink that is equivalent to a lavatory except it serves more than one person.
Wash Sink: A long rectangular sink that is equivalent to a lavatory except it serves more than one person.
Waste: Liquid discharge into the plumbing drainage system from a fixture, appliance, or other connection that does not contain urine or fecal matter.
Waste Stack, Pipe, or Piping: Pipe that conveys the discharge from fixtures (other than urinals and water closets) and appliances that does not contain urine or fecal matter.
Water Bottle Filling Station: A drinking water supply fixture that is connected to the domestic water supply and drain piping and provides for individuals to fill personal-use water bottles. Stations can be recessed or wall- mounted and can include filtration units, self-contained refrigeration units, and drinking fountains.
Water Closet, Pressure Assisted: A low consumption water closet with an air accumulator vessel in the tank that stores water and air under pressure, using the water supply pressure. When flushed, the air produces a high velocity jet of water and air that forces the contents out of the bowl.
Water Closet, Pump Assisted: A low consumption water closet with a fractional horsepower pump in the tank that produces a high velocity jet in the trapway that assists the flushing action.
Water Closet, Vacuum Assisted: A low consumption water closet that uses the falling water level in the tank to induce a vacuum near the outlet of the trapway that assists the flushing action.
Water Closet, Wall Hung: A water closet designed and installed in such a way that no part of it touches the floor. See Figure 1.2.80
Figure 1.2.80
A WALL HUNG WATER CLOSET
Water Distribution Piping: Piping within the building or on the premises that conveys water from the water service piping to its points of use. It includes hot and cold water supply piping. See Figure 1.2.81
Figure 1.2.81
WATER DISTRIBUTION PIPING
Water Hammer Arrestor: A manufactured pre-charged device operating through the compressibility of air. See Figure 1.2.3
Comment: Water hammer arrestors are either the bellows or piston type and are pre-charged with compressed air or gas. The Code no longer mentions air chambers, which are subject to losing their initial captive air charge through absorption into the system water.
Water Main: A water supply line that serves the public or a community and is under the jurisdiction of a municipality or water purveyor.
Water Service Piping: Piping from a water main or other source of potable water supply to the water distribution system within the building served. See Figure 1.2.82 and Section 10.6
Figure 1.2.82
THE WATER SERVICE PIPE IN A PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY
Wet Vent: See "Vent, Wet"
Whirlpool Bathtub: A plumbing appliance consisting of a bathtub fixture that is equipped and fitted with a circulation piping system, pump, and other appurtenances and is so designed to accept, circulate, and discharge bathtub water upon each use. See Figure 1.2.83
Figure 1.2.83
A WHIRLPOOL BATH
WSFU: See "Fixture Unit (Water Supply - WSFU)"
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