Heads up: There are no amended sections in this chapter.
The definitions contained in this chapter shall apply to the terms used in this standard. Where terms are not defined in this chapter or within another chapter, they shall be defined using their ordinarily accepted meanings within the context in which they are used. Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition, shall be the source for the ordinarily accepted meaning.
An organization, office, or individual responsible for enforcing the requirements of a code or standard, or for approving equipment, materials, an installation, or a procedure.
Equipment, materials, or services included in a list published by an organization that is acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction and concerned with evaluation of products or services, that maintains periodic inspection of production of listed equipment or materials or periodic evaluation of services, and whose listing states that either the equipment, material, or service meets appropriate designated standards or has been tested and found suitable for a specified purpose.
Indicates a mandatory requirement.
Indicates a recommendation or that which is advised but not required.
An NFPA Standard, the main text of which contains only mandatory provisions using the word "shall" to indicate requirements and that is in a form generally suitable for mandatory reference by another standard or code or for adoption into law. Nonmandatory provisions are not to be considered a part of the requirements of a standard and shall be located in an appendix, annex, footnote, informational note, or other means as permitted in the NFPA Manuals of Style. When used in a generic sense, such as in the phrase "standards development process" or "standards development activities," the term "standards" includes all NFPA Standards, including Codes, Standards, Recommended Practices, and Guides.
A fire suppression or control device that operates automatically when its heat-activated element is heated to its thermal rating or above, allowing water to discharge over a specified area.
Within a dwelling unit, any room or compartment dedicated to personal hygiene, containing a toilet, sink, or bathing capability such as a shower or tub.
The distance between the floor and the underside of the ceiling above (or roof deck) within the area.
An architectural ceiling feature that consists of a bounded area of ceiling located at a higher elevation than the attached lower ceiling.
Any ceiling system installed in the same plane with horizontal openings to the structure above on all sides. This does not include sloped ceilings as defined in 3.3.5.4.
A continuous ceiling in a single plane.
A ceiling with a slope not exceeding 2 in 12.
A ceiling with a slope exceeding 2 in 12.
A continuous ceiling free from significant irregularities, lumps, or indentations.
A space completely enclosed by walls and a ceiling. Each wall in the compartment is permitted to have openings to an adjoining space if the openings have a minimum lintel depth of 8 in. (200 mm) from the ceiling and the total width of the openings in each wall does not exceed 8 ft (2.4 m). A single opening of 36 in. (900 mm) or less in width without a lintel is permitted when there are no other openings to adjoining spaces.
A valve controlling flow to water-based fire protection systems and devices.
A continuous material protruding downward from the ceiling to create a reservoir for collecting smoke and heat.
A suspended ceiling system, which is installed below the sprinklers, with listed translucent or opaque panels that are heat sensitive and fall from their setting when exposed to heat.
One or more rooms arranged for the use of one or more individuals living together, as in a single housekeeping unit normally having cooking, living, sanitary, and sleeping facilities that include, but are not limited to, hotel rooms, dormitory rooms, apartments, condominiums, sleeping rooms in nursing homes, and similar living units.
Limiting the size of a fire by distribution of water so as to decrease the heat release rate and pre-wet adjacent combustibles, while controlling ceiling gas temperatures to avoid structural damage.
Sharply reducing the heat release rate of a fire and preventing its regrowth by means of direct and sufficient application of water through the fire plume to the burning fuel surface.
An appliance that produces heat by burning fuel.
A ceiling fan that is approximately 6 ft (1.8 m) to 24 ft (7.3 m) in diameter with a rotational speed of approximately 30 to 70 revolutions per minute.
A calculated sprinkler system in which pipe sizes are selected on a pressure loss basis to provide a prescribed water density, in gallons per minute per square foot (mm/min), or a prescribed minimum discharge pressure or flow per sprinkler, distributed with a reasonable degree of uniformity over a specified area.
Refers to a building construction material not complying with the definition of noncombustible material that, in the form in which it is used, has a potential heat value not exceeding 3500 Btu/lb (8100 kJ/kg), where tested in accordance with NFPA 259, and includes either of the following: (1) materials having a structural base of noncombustible material, with a surfacing not exceeding a thickness of 1/8 in. (3.2 mm) that has a flame spread index not greater than 50; or (2) materials, in the form and thickness used, having neither a flame spread index greater than 25 nor evidence of continued progressive combustion, and of such composition that surfaces that would be exposed by cutting through the material on any plane would have neither a flame spread index greater than 25 nor evidence of continued progressive combustion, when tested in accordance with ASTM E84, Standard Test Method of Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials, or ANSI/UL 723, Standard Test Method of Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials.
A material that, in the form in which it is used and under the conditions anticipated, will not ignite, burn, support combustion, or release flammable vapors, when subjected to fire or heat; materials that are reported as passing ASTM E136, Standard Test Method for Behavior of Materials in a Vertical Tube Furnace at 750°C, shall be considered noncombustible materials.
An obstruction located at or below the level of sprinkler deflectors that affect the discharge pattern of two or more adjacent sprinklers.
An obstruction at or below the level of the sprinkler deflector that affects the discharge pattern of a single sprinkler.
A water supply that has not been treated and could contain foreign material that could enter the sprinkler system.
As used in this standard, shop in the term shop-welded means either (1) a sprinkler contractor's or fabricator's premise or (2) an area specifically designed or authorized for welding, such as a detached outside location, maintenance shop, or other area (either temporary or permanent) of noncombustible or fire-resistive construction free of combustible and flammable contents and suitably segregated from adjacent areas.
Openings in the ceiling or construction features of a concealed space that allow limited amounts of heat to enter the concealed space.
A compartment of light hazard occupancy classification having unobstructed construction and a floor area not exceeding 800 ft2 (74 m2).
A system that consists of an integrated network of piping designed in accordance with fire protection engineering standards that includes a water supply source, a water control valve, a waterflow alarm, and a drain. The portion of the sprinkler system above ground is a network of specifically sized or hydraulically designed piping installed in a building, structure, or area, generally overhead, and to which sprinklers are attached in a systematic pattern. The system is commonly activated by heat from a fire and discharges water over the fire area.
The maximum anticipated static (nonflowing) or flowing pressure applied to sprinkler system components exclusive of surge pressures and exclusive of pressure from the fire department connection.
A material that limits the average temperature rise of the unexposed surface to not more than 250°F (121°C) above ambient for a specified fire exposure duration using the standard time-temperature curve of ASTM E119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials.
A wet pipe system using automatic sprinklers that contains a liquid solution to prevent freezing of the system, intended to discharge the solution upon sprinkler operation, followed immediately by water from a water supply.
A mixture of an antifreeze material with water that is prepared and factory-mixed by the manufacturer with a quality control procedure in place that ensures that the antifreeze solution remains homogeneous and that the concentration is as specified.
A wet pipe sprinkler system having non-fire protection connections to automatic sprinkler systems in a closed-loop piping arrangement for the purpose of utilizing sprinkler piping to conduct water for heating or cooling, where water is not removed or used from the system but only circulated through the piping system.
A sprinkler system employing automatic sprinklers attached to a piping system containing air under pressure with a supplemental detection system installed in the same areas as the sprinklers. Operation of the detection system actuates tripping devices that open dry pipe valves simultaneously and without loss of air pressure in the system. The detection system also serves as an automatic fire alarm system.
A sprinkler system employing open sprinklers or nozzles that are attached to a piping system that is connected to a water supply through a valve that is opened by the operation of a detection system installed in the same areas as the sprinklers or the nozzles. When this valve opens, water flows into the piping system and discharges from all sprinklers or nozzles attached thereto.
A sprinkler system employing automatic sprinklers that are attached to a piping system containing air or nitrogen under pressure, the release of which (as from the opening of a sprinkler) permits the water pressure to open a valve known as a dry pipe valve, and the water then flows into the piping system and out the opened sprinklers.
A sprinkler system in which parallel cross mains are connected by multiple branch lines, causing an operating sprinkler to receive water from both ends of its branch line while other branch lines help transfer water between cross mains.
A sprinkler system in which multiple cross mains are tied together so as to provide more than one path for water to flow to an operating sprinkler and branch lines are not tied together.
A type of sprinkler system capable of repeated on-off flow cycles in response to heat.
A sprinkler system in which the pipe sizing is selected from a schedule that is determined by the occupancy classification and in which a given number of sprinklers are allowed to be supplied from specific sizes of pipe.
A sprinkler system employing automatic sprinklers that are attached to a piping system that contains air that might or might not be under pressure, with a supplemental detection system installed in the same areas as the sprinklers.
A sprinkler system employing automatic sprinklers attached to a piping system containing water and connected to a water supply so that water discharges immediately from sprinklers opened by heat from a fire.
A chamber, compatible with an air compressor, that can store air under pressure that is higher in pressure than that in the dry pipe or preaction system piping.
A chamber that can store air at the same pressure that is in the wet pipe system piping.
A horizontal pipe that extends from the branch line to a single sprinkler or a sprinkler above and below a ceiling.
The pipes supplying sprinklers, either directly or through sprigs, drops, return bends, or arm-overs.
The pipes supplying the branch lines, either directly or through riser nipples.
A male by female adapter intended to be used with a sprinkler to adjust the final fit where the sprinkler is installed in a finished ceiling or wall.
The pipes supplying cross mains, either directly or through risers.
A listed coupling or fitting that allows axial displacement, rotation, and at least 1 degree of angular movement of the pipe without inducing harm on the pipe. For pipe diameters of 8 in. (200 mm) and larger, the angular movement shall be permitted to be less than 1 degree but not less than 0.5 degree.
A vertical pipe between the cross main and branch line.
The vertical supply pipes in a sprinkler system.
A pipe that rises vertically and supplies a single sprinkler.
A device arranged to supervise the operative condition of automatic sprinkler systems.
The aboveground horizontal or vertical pipe between the water supply and the mains (cross or feed) that contains a control valve (either directly or within its supply pipe), a pressure gauge, a main drain, and a waterflow alarm device.
An attachment to the sprinkler system that detects a predetermined water flow and is connected to a fire alarm system to initiate an alarm condition or is used to mechanically or electrically initiate a fire pump or local audible or visual alarm.
The following are characteristics of a sprinkler that define its ability to control or extinguish a fire. (1) Thermal sensitivity. A measure of the rapidity with which the thermal element operates as installed in a specific sprinkler or sprinkler assembly. One measure of thermal sensitivity is the response time index (RTI) as measured under standardized test conditions. (a) Sprinklers defined as fast response have a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meters-seconds)1/2 or less. (b) Sprinklers defined as standard response have a thermal element with an RTI of 80 (meters-seconds)1/2 or more. (2) Temperature rating. (3) K-factor (see Chapter 6). (4) Installation orientation (see 3.6.2). (5) Water distribution characteristics (i.e., application rate, wall wetting). (6) Special service conditions (see 3.6.3).
The following sprinklers are defined according to orientation.
A sprinkler in which all or part of the body, including the shank thread, is mounted above the lower plane of the ceiling.
A sprinkler designed to be installed in such a way that the water stream is directed downward against the deflector.
A sprinkler in which all or part of the body, other than the shank thread, is mounted within a recessed housing.
A sprinkler having special deflectors that are designed to discharge most of the water away from the nearby wall in a pattern resembling one-quarter of a sphere, with a small portion of the discharge directed at the wall behind the sprinkler.
A sprinkler designed to be installed in such a way that the water spray is directed upwards against the deflector.
The following sprinklers are defined according to special application or environment.
A sprinkler fabricated with corrosion-resistant material, or with special coatings or platings, to be used in an atmosphere that would normally corrode sprinklers.
A sprinkler secured in an extension nipple that has a seal at the inlet end to prevent water from entering the nipple until the sprinkler operates.
A sprinkler specially designed for resistance to load-bearing purposes and with components not readily converted for use as weapons.
A sprinkler equipped with integral shields to protect its operating elements from the discharge of sprinklers installed at higher elevations.
A sprinkler that has been painted or plated by the manufacturer.
A standard spray sprinkler or thermostatic fixed-temperature release device used as a detector to pneumatically or hydraulically release the main valve, controlling the flow of water into a fire protection system.
The following sprinklers are defined according to design and performance characteristics.
A type of spray sprinkler intended to provide fire control in storage applications using the design density/area criteria described in this standard.
A type of spray sprinkler that is capable of producing characteristic large water droplets and that is listed for its capability to provide fire control of specific high-challenge fire hazards.
A type of fast-response sprinkler that has a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meters-seconds)1/2 or less and is listed for its capability to provide fire suppression of specific high-challenge fire hazards.
A type of spray sprinkler with maximum coverage areas as specified in Sections 8.8 and 8.9 of this standard.
A device for use in applications requiring special water discharge patterns, directional spray, or other unusual discharge characteristics.
A sprinkler that directs from 40 percent to 60 percent of the total water initially in a downward direction and that is designed to be installed with the deflector either upright or pendent.
A sprinkler that does not have actuators or heat-responsive elements.
A type of spray sprinkler that has a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meter-seconds)1/2 or less and is listed as a quick-response sprinkler for its intended use.
A type of quick-response sprinkler that has a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meter-seconds)1/2 or less and is listed for its capability to provide fire suppression of specific fire hazards.
A type of quick-response sprinkler that has a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meter-seconds)1/2 or less and complies with the extended protection areas defined in Chapter 8.
A type of fast-response sprinkler having a thermal element with an RTI of 50 (meters-seconds)1/2 or less that has been specifically investigated for its ability to enhance survivability in the room of fire origin, and that is listed for use in the protection of dwelling units.
A sprinkler that has been tested and listed as prescribed in 8.4.8.
A type of sprinkler listed for its capability to provide fire control for a wide range of fire hazards.
A spray sprinkler with maximum coverage areas as specified in Sections 8.6 and 8.7 of this standard.
Panel construction and other construction where beams, trusses, or other members impede heat flow or water distribution in a manner that materially affects the ability of sprinklers to control or suppress a fire.
Construction where beams, trusses, or other members do not impede heat flow or water distribution in a manner that materially affects the ability of sprinklers to control or suppress a fire. Unobstructed construction has horizontal structural members that are not solid, where the openings are at least 70 percent of the cross-section area and the depth of the member does not exceed the least dimension of the openings, or all construction types, with the exception of panel construction, where the spacing of structural members exceeds 71/2 ft (2.3 m) on center.
An accessory or attachment that enables the private fire service main to perform its intended function. [24, 2013]
Piping that has the property of being able to withstand deterioration of its surface or its properties when exposed to its environment. [24, 2013]
A lining or coating material that when applied to piping or appurtenances has the property of reducing or slowing the deterioration of the object's surface or properties when exposed to its environment. [24, 2016]
A connection through which the fire department can pump supplemental water into the sprinkler system, standpipe, or other water-based fire protection systems, furnishing water for fire extinguishment to supplement existing water supplies. [24, 2016]
A pump that is a provider of liquid flow and pressure dedicated to fire protection. [20, 2013]
An enclosure located over or adjacent to a hydrant or other water supply designed to contain the necessary hose nozzles, hose wrenches, gaskets, and spanners to be used in fire fighting in conjunction with and to provide aid to the local fire department. [24, 2013]
The hose connection outlet of a hydrant. [24, 2013]
The waterflow rate for a system or hose stream that has been calculated using accepted engineering practices. [24, 2013]
The pressure that exists in the distribution system, measured at the residual hydrant at the time the flow readings are taken at the flow hydrants. [24, 2013]
The pressure that exists at a given point under normal distribution system conditions measured at the residual hydrant with no hydrants flowing. [24, 2013]
A device designed for the purpose of reducing, regulating, controlling, or restricting water pressure. [24, 2013]
Private fire service main, as used in this standard, is that pipe and its appurtenances on private property (1) between a source of water and the base of the system riser for water-based fire protection systems, (2) between a source of water and inlets to foam-making systems, (3) between a source of water and the base elbow of private hydrants or monitor nozzles, and (4) used as fire pump suction and discharge piping, (5) beginning at the inlet side of the check valve on a gravity or pressure tank. [24, 2013]
The hydrant outlet intended to be connected to a fire department pumper for use in taking supply from the hydrant for pumpers. [24, 2016]
The flow available from a hydrant at the designated residual pressure (rated pressure) either measured or calculated. [24, 2013]
A test performed by the flow and measurement of water from one hydrant and the static and residual pressures from an adjacent hydrant for the purpose of determining the available water supply at that location. [24, 2013]
A test of a piping system using flowrates intended to remove debris from the piping system prior to it being placed in service. [24, 2016]
A test of a closed piping system and its attached appurtenances consisting of subjecting the piping to an increased internal pressure for a specified period of duration to verify system integrity and leak rates. [24, 2013]
A valve that allows flow in one direction only. [24, 2013]
A valve that has components that provide the valve operating position, open or closed. [24, 2016]
An exterior valved connection to a water supply system that provides hose connections. [24, 2013]
A type of hydrant with the main control valve below the frost line between the footpiece and the barrel. [24, 2016]
The hydrant that is used for the flow and flow measurement of water during a flow test. [24, 2013]
A valved connection on a water supply system having one or more outlets and that is used to supply hose and fire department pumpers with water on private property. [24, 2013]
A valved connection on a water supply system having one or more outlets and that is used to supply hose and fire department pumpers with water. [24, 2013]
The hydrant that is used for measuring static and residual pressures during a flow test. [24, 2013]
A type of hydrant that is intended for use where there is no danger of freezing weather, where each outlet is provided with a valve and an outlet. [24, 2016]
A method of storage consisting of corrugated cardboard or paperboard containers fully enclosing the commodity.
A Class III commodity consisting predominantly of paper records in cardboard cartons.
For the purposes of carton records storage, a storage aid consisting of either open metal grating or solid horizontal barriers supported from a rack storage system that is utilized as a walkway for access to storage at elevated levels. Catwalks are accessed using stairs and are not separate floors of a building.
The distance from the top of storage to the ceiling above.
The combination of products, packing material, and container that determines commodity classification.
Storage on solid shelves not exceeding 36 in. (900 mm) in total depth, arranged as part of a compact storage module, with no more than 30 in. (750 mm) between shelves vertically and with no internal vertical flue spaces other than those between individual shelving sections.
A type of shelving unit consisting of compact storage whereby the units move to allow for storage to be pushed together creating a storage unit with no flues or minimal spaces between units. Aisles are created by moving the shelving unit. Compact storage modules can be manual or electric in operation.
The rigid separation of the products in a container by dividers that form a stable unit under fire conditions.
A receptacle strong enough, by reason of material, design, and construction, to be shipped safely without further packaging.
A material-handling aid designed to support a unit load with openings to provide access for material-handling devices. (See Figure A.3.9.1.10.)
A method of packaging that either consists of a plastic sheet completely enclosing the sides and top of a pallet load containing a combustible commodity, a combustible package, or a group of combustible commodities or combustible packages, or consists of combustible commodities individually wrapped in plastic sheeting and stored exposed in a pallet load.
Those plastics, the density of which is reduced by the presence of numerous small cavities (cells), interconnecting or not, dispersed throughout their mass.
Those plastics not in packaging or coverings that absorb water or otherwise appreciably retard the burning hazard of the commodity. (Paper wrapped or encapsulated, or both, should be considered exposed.)
Those plastics that fall out of their containers during a fire, fill flue spaces, and create a smothering effect on the fire. Examples include powder, pellets, flakes, or random-packed small objects [e.g., razor blade dispensers, 1 oz to 2 oz (28 g to 57 g) bottles].
A fire hazard typical of that produced by fires in combustible high-piled storage.
Solid-piled, palletized, rack storage, bin box, and shelf storage in excess of 12 ft (3.7 m) in height.
Solid-piled, palletized, rack storage, bin box, and shelf storage up to 12 ft (3.7 m) in height.
Storage that does not exceed 12 ft (3.66 m) in height, is incidental to another occupancy use group, does not constitute more than 10 percent of the building area or 4000 ft2 (372 m2) of the sprinklered area, whichever is greater, does not exceed 1000 ft2 (93 m2) in one pile or area, and is separated from other storage areas by at least 25 ft (7.62 m).
A container of any shape that is entirely or partially open on the top and arranged so as to allow for the collection of discharging sprinkler water cascading through the storage array.
A commodity wrapping, cushioning, or container.
A pallet having any portion of its construction consisting of a plastic material.
A plastic pallet incorporating a secondary reinforcing material (such as steel or fiberglass) within the pallet.
The distance between the floor and the underside of the roof deck within the storage area.
A special pallet captive to a material handling system. (See Figure A.3.9.1.10.)
Commodity storage devices, such as pallets, dunnage, separators, and skids.
A pallet load or module held together in some manner and normally transported by material handling equipment.
A pallet constructed entirely of wood with metal fasteners.
A storage arrangement where air movement through the pile is restricted because of 6 in. (150 mm) or less vertical flues.
A storage arrangement where air movement through the pile is enhanced because of vertical flues larger than 6 in. (150 mm).
Storage in five-sided wood, metal, or cardboard boxes with open face on the aisles in which boxes are self-supporting or supported by a structure so designed that little or no horizontal or vertical space exists around boxes.
Storage of commodities on pallets or other storage aids that form horizontal spaces between tiers of storage.
Those arrays where collapse, spillage of content, or leaning of stacks across flue spaces is not likely to occur soon after initial fire development.
Those arrays where collapse, spillage of contents, or leaning of stacks across flue spaces occurs soon after initial fire development.
Storage on structures up to and including 30 in. (750 mm) deep and separated by aisles at least 30 in. (750 mm) wide.
Two solid or perforated shelves up to 30 in. (750 mm) in depth each, not exceeding a total depth of 60 in. (1.5 m), separated by a longitudinal vertical barrier such as plywood, particleboard, sheet metal, or equivalent, with a maximum 0.25 in. (6 mm) diameter penetrations and no longitudinal flue space and a maximum storage height of 15 ft (4.6 m).
Storage of commodities stacked on each other.
A load that does not have voids (air) within the load and that burns only on the exterior of the load; water from sprinklers might reach most surfaces available to burn.
The horizontal dimension between the face of the loads in racks under consideration.
Instrument panels, windshields, metal and plastic gasoline tanks, heater housings, door panels, interior trim, bumper facia, wiring harnesses, sheet metal, body components, engines, driveline components, steering mechanisms, auxiliary motors, and lighting — all with or without expanded Group A plastic dunnage. This definition does not include the storage of air bags, tires, and seats on portable racks.
A vertical barrier across the rack.
Standard sprinklers that are located in transverse flue spaces along the aisle or in the rack, are within 18 in. (450 mm) of the aisle face of storage, and are used to oppose vertical development of fire on the external face of storage.
A solid barrier in the horizontal position covering the entire rack, including all flue spaces at certain height increments, to prevent vertical fire spread.
The space between rows of storage perpendicular to the direction of loading with a width not exceeding 24 in. (600 mm) between storage.
Any combination of vertical, horizontal, and diagonal members that supports stored materials. [1, 2015]
Racks less than or equal to 12 ft (300 mm) in depth or single-row racks placed back to back having an aggregate depth up to 12 ft (300 mm), with aisles having an aisle width of at least 3.5 ft (1.1 m) between loads on racks.
Racks on fixed rails or guides that can be moved back and forth only in a horizontal, two-dimensional plane. A moving aisle is created as abutting racks are either loaded or unloaded, then moved across the aisle to abut other racks.
Racks greater than 12 ft (300 mm) in depth or single- or double-row racks separated by aisles less than 3.5 ft (1.1 m) wide having an overall width greater than 12 ft (300 mm).
Racks without shelving or with shelving in racks that are fixed in place with shelves having a solid surface and a shelf area equal to or less than 20 ft2 (1.9 m2) or with shelves having a wire mesh, slatted surface, or other material with openings representing at least 50 percent of the shelf area including the horizontal area of rack members and where the flue spaces are maintained.
Racks that are not fixed in place and can be arranged in any number of configurations.
The area of the horizontal surface of a shelf in a rack defined by perimeter aisle(s) or nominal 6 in. (150 mm) flue spaces on all four sides, or by the placement of loads that block openings that would otherwise serve as the required flue spaces.
Racks that have no longitudinal flue space and that have a depth up to 6 ft (1.8 m) with aisles having a width of at least 3.5 ft (1.1 m) between loads on racks.
A rack where shelves are fixed in place with a series of narrow individual solid supports used as the shelf material and spaced apart with regular openings.
A rack that is not defined as an open rack where shelves are fixed in place with a solid, slatted, or wire mesh barrier used as the shelf material and having limited openings in the shelf area.
Shelving that is fixed in place, slatted, wire mesh, or other type of shelves located within racks. The area of a solid shelf is defined by perimeter aisle or flue space on all four sides or by the placement of loads that block openings that would otherwise serve as the required flue spaces. Solid shelves having an area equal to or less than 20 ft2 (1.9 m2) are defined as open racks. Shelves of wire mesh, slats, or other materials more than 50 percent open and where the flue spaces are maintained are defined as open racks.
The space between rows of storage parallel to the direction of loading. (See Figure A.3.9.3.6.)
A storage method in which a number of tires are strapped together.
Any uninterrupted space in excess of 5 ft (1.5 m) in length between horizontal layers of stored tires. Such channels can be formed by pallets, shelving, racks, or other storage arrangements.
Tires stored where the sides of the tires overlap, creating a woven or laced appearance. [See Figure A.3.9.4.9(g).]
The storage of rubber tires that is incidental to the main use of the building; storage areas do not exceed 2000 ft2 (186 m2), and on-tread storage piles, regardless of storage method, do not exceed 25 ft (7.6 m) in the direction of the wheel holes. Acceptable storage arrangements include (a) on-floor, on-side storage up to 12 ft (300 mm) high; (b) on-floor, on-tread storage up to 5 ft (1.5 m) high; (c) double-row or multirow fixed or portable rack storage on-side or on-tread up to 5 ft (1.5 m) high; (d) single-row fixed or portable rack storage on-side or on-tread up to 12 ft (300 mm) high; and (e) laced tires in racks up to 5 ft (1.5 m) in height.
Tires stored horizontally or flat.
Tires stored vertically or on their treads.
Storage on portable racks of various types utilizing a conventional pallet as a base.
On-floor storage in which tires are formed into a pyramid to provide pile stability.
See Figure A.3.9.4.9(a) through Figure A.3.9.4.9(g).
Pneumatic tires for passenger automobiles, aircraft, light and heavy trucks, trailers, farm equipment, construction equipment (off-the-road), and buses.
A vertical storage arrangement in which the distances between columns in both directions are short [not more than 2 in. (50 mm) in one direction and 1 in. (25 mm) in the other].
A vertical storage arrangement in which the distance between columns in both directions is lengthy (all vertical arrays other than closed or standard).
A vertical storage arrangement in which the distance between columns in one direction is short [1 in. (25 mm) or less] and is in excess of 2 in. (50 mm) in the other direction.
Rolls provided with a circumferential steel strap [3/8 in. (9.5 mm) or wider] at each end of the roll.
A single vertical stack of rolls.
The central tube around which paper is wound to form a roll.
The term for all kinds of felted sheets made from natural fibrous materials, usually vegetable but sometimes mineral or animal, and formed on a fine wire screen from water suspension.
Rolls stored with the cores in the horizontal plane (on-side storage).
Rolls stored with the cores in the vertical plane (on-end storage).
Rolls provided with a complete heavy kraft covering around both sides and ends.
The maximum vertical distance above the floor at which roll paper is normally stored.
A natural seed fiber wrapped and secured in industry-accepted materials, usually consisting of burlap, woven polypropylene, or sheet polyethylene, and secured with steel, synthetic or wire bands, or wire; also includes linters (lint removed from the cottonseed) and motes (residual materials from the ginning process). (See Table A.3.9.6.1.)
An arrangement in which bales are stored directly on the floor, two or more bales high.
These definitions apply to Chapter 26 only.
A boundary designed to resist the passage of smoke and flame for 1 hour when tested in accordance with ASTM E119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials.
A boundary designed to resist the passage of flame for 1/2 hour when tested in accordance with ASTM E119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials.
A continuously manned control station from which all of the fire control equipment is monitored. If this station is not the bridge, direct communication with the bridge must be provided by means other than the ship's service telephone.
A material whose melting point is below 1700°F (927°C).
The inclination of a ship to one side.
The angle defined by the intersection of a vertical line through the center of a vessel and a line perpendicular to the surface of the water.
A universal connection to the vessel's fire main to which a shoreside fire-fighting water supply can be connected.
A sprinkler system installed on a ship, boat, or other floating structure that takes its supply from the water on which the vessel floats.
An assembly that is constructed of noncombustible materials and made intact with the main structure of the vessel, such as shell, structural bulkheads, and decks; meets the requirements of a B-Class boundary; and is insulated such that, if tested in accordance with ASTM E119, Standard Test Methods for Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials, for 15 minutes, the average temperature of the unexposed side does not rise more than 250°F (139°C) above the original temperature, nor does the temperature at any one point, including any joint, rise more than 405°F (225°C) above the original temperature.
The supply portion of the sprinkler system from the water pressure tank or the sea suction of the designated sprinkler system pump up to and including the valve that isolates the sprinkler system from these two water sources.
A visual and audible alarm signal given at the central safety station to indicate when the system is in operation or when a condition that would impair the satisfactory operation of the system exists. Supervisory alarms must give a distinct indication for each individual system component that is monitored.
The maximum angle to which a vessel is permitted to heel after the assumed damage required by stability regulations is imposed.
A fully enclosed stair that serves all levels of a vessel in which persons can be employed.
The seismic coefficient that combines ground motion and seismic response factors from SEI/ASCE 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures.
The horizontal force due to seismic load acting on a brace at working stress levels.
Adjacent sway braces or a sway brace assembly intended to resist differential movement of the system piping in all horizontal directions.
A device or assembly used to support the gravity load of the system piping.
A sway brace intended to resist differential movement perpendicular to the axis of the system piping.
A sway brace intended to resist differential movement parallel to the axis of the system piping.
The vertical reaction due to the angle of installation of sway braces on system piping resulting from earthquake motion.
A device used for fastening pipe to the building structure, installed in hardened concrete.
Subsection 3.11.9 was added by a tentative interim amendment (TIA). See page 1.
A factor based on fitting geometry and brace angle from vertical that results in an increase in tension load due to the effects of prying between the upper seismic brace attachment fitting and the structure.
The maximum considered earthquake ground motion for 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5 percent of critical damping), site Class B for a specific site.
An assembly of fittings, pipe, flexible pipe, and/or couplings that permits movement in all directions to accommodate seismic differential movement across building seismic separation joints.
An assembly intended to be attached to the system piping to resist horizontal earthquake loads in two directions.
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