CODES

ADOPTS WITH AMENDMENTS:

International Existing Building Code 2009 (IEBC 2009)

Copyright

Preface

Effective Use of the International Existing Building Code

Ordinance

Chapter 1 Scope and Administration

Chapter 2 Definitions

Chapter 3 Prescriptive Compliance Method

Chapter 4 Classification of Work

Chapter 5 Repairs

Chapter 6 Alterations - Level 1

Chapter 7 Alterations - Level 2

Chapter 8 Alterations - Level 3

Chapter 9 Change of Occupancy

Chapter 10 Additions

Chapter 11 Historic Buildings

Chapter 12 Relocated or Moved Buildings

Chapter 13 Performance Compliance Methods

Chapter 14 Construction Safeguards

Chapter 15 Referenced Standards

Chapter A1 Seismic Strengthening Provisions for Unreinforced Masonry Bearing Wall Buildings

Chapter A2 Earthquake Hazard Reduction in Existing Reinforced Concrete and Reinforced Masonry Wall Buildings With Flexible Diaphragms

Chapter A3 Prescriptive Provisions for Seismic Strengthening of Cripple Walls and Sill Plate Anchorage of Light, Woodframe Residential Buildings

Chapter A4 Earthquake Hazard Reduction in Existing Woodframe Residential Buildings With Soft, Weak or Openfront Walls

Chapter A5 A5 Earthquake Hazard Reduction in Existing Concrete Buildings

Appendix A Guidelines for the Seismic Retrofit of Existing Buildings

Appendix B Supplementary Accessibility Requirements for Existing Buildings and Facilities

Resource A1 Fire-Related Performance of Archaic Materials and Assemblies

Resource A2 Building Evaluation

Resouce A3 : Final Evaluation and Design Solution

Resource A4 Summary

Resource A Appendix : Table of Contents

Resource A Appendix: Section I - Walls

Resource A Appendix : Section II - Columns

Resource A Appendix : Section III - Floor/Ceiling Assemblies

Resource A Appendix : Section IV - Beams

Resource A Appendix : Section V - Doors

Bibliography

4
SUMMARY

This section summarizes the various approaches and design solutions discussed in the preceding sections of the guideline. The term “structural system” includes: frames, beams, columns, and other structural elements. “Cover” is a protective layer(s) of materials or membrane which slows the flow of heat to the structural elements. It cannot be stressed too strongly that the fire endurance of actual building elements can be greatly reduced or totally negated by removing part of the cover to allow pipes, ducts, or conduits to pass through the element. This must be repaired in the rehabilitation process.

* Cover: the protective layer or membrane of material which slows the flow of heat to the structural elements.

The following approaches shall be considered equivalent.

4.1 The fire resistance of a building element can be established from the Appendix Tables. This is subject to the following limitations:

The building element in the rehabilitated building shall be constructed of the same materials with the same nominal dimensions as stated in the tables.

All penetrations in the building element or its cover for services such as electricity, plumbing, and HVAC shall be packed with noncombustible cementitious materials and so fixed that the packing material will not fall out when it loses its water of hydration.

The effects of age and wear and tear shall be repaired so that the building element is sound and the original thickness of all components, particularly covers and floor slabs, is maintained.

This approach essentially follows the approach taken by model building codes. The assembly must appear in a table either published in or accepted by the code for a given fire resistance rating to be recognized and accepted.

4.2 The fire resistance of a building element which does not explicitly appear in the Appendix Tables can be established if one or more elements of same design but different dimensions have been listed in the tables. For walls, the existing element must be thicker than the one listed. For floor/ceiling assemblies, the assembly listed in the table must have the same or less cover and the same or thinner slab constructed of the same material as the actual floor/ceiling assembly. For other structural elements, the element listed in the table must be of a similar design but with less cover thickness. The fire resistance in all instances shall be the fire resistance recommended in the table. This is subject to the following limitations:

The actual element in the rehabilitated building shall be constructed of the same materials as listed in the table. Only the following dimensions may vary from those specified: for walls, the overall thickness must exceed that specified in the table; for floor/ceiling assemblies, the thickness of the cover and the slab must be greater than, or equal to, that specified in the table; for other structural elements, the thickness of the cover must be greater than that specified in the table.

All penetrations in the building element or its cover for services such as electricity, plumbing, or HVAC shall be packed with noncombustible cementitious materials and so fixed that the packing material will not fall out when it loses its water of hydration.

FIGURE 3

MODIFICATION DETAILS

The effects of age and wear and tear shall be repaired so that the building element is sound and the original thickness of all components, particularly covers and floor slabs, is maintained.

This approach is an application of the “thickness design” concept presented in Part 3.3 of the guideline. There should be many instances when a thicker building element was utilized than the one listed in the Appendix Tables. This guideline recognizes the inherent superiority of a thicker design. Note: “thickness design” for floor/ceiling assemblies and structural elements refers to cover and slab thickness rather than total thickness.

The “thickness design” concept is essentially a special case of Harmathy’s Rules (specifically Rules 1 and 2). It should be recognized that the only source of data is the Appendix Tables. If other data are used, it must be in connection with the approach below.

4.3 The fire resistance of building elements can be established by applying Harmathy’s Ten Rules of Fire Resistance Ratings as set forth in Part 3.2 of the guideline. This is subject to the following limitations:

The data from the tables can be utilized subject to the limitations in 4.2 above.

Test reports from recognized journals or published papers can be used to support data utilized in applying Harmathy’s Rules.

Calculations utilizing recognized and well established computational techniques can be used in applying Harmathy’s Rules. These include, but are not limited to, analysis of heat flow, mechanical properties, deflections, and load bearing capacity.

Resources