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CALIFORNIA GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS CODE — MATRIX ADOPTION TABLE
CHAPTER 4 — RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES
(Matrix Adoption Tables are nonregulatory, intended only as an aid to the code user.
See Chapter 1 for state agency authority and building applications.)
Adopting agency BSC BSC-
CG
SFM HCD DSA OSHPD BSCC DPH AGR DWR CEC CA SL SLC
1 2 1/AC AC SS 1 1R 2 3 4 5
Adopt entire CA chapter X
Adopt entire chapter as
amended (amended
sections listed below)
Adopt only those sections
that are listed below
Chapter/Section
4.2

The state agency does not adopt sections identified by the following symbol: †.
The provisions of this division outline planning, design and development methods that include environmentally responsible site selection, building design, building siting and development to protect, restore and enhance the environmental quality of the site and respect the integrity of adjacent properties.
The following terms are defined in Chapter 2.
Preservation and use of available natural resources shall be accomplished through evaluation and careful planning to minimize negative effects on the site and adjacent areas. Preservation of slopes, management of storm water drainage and erosion controls shall comply with this section.
Projects which disturb soil shall manage storm water drainage during construction. In order to manage storm water drainage during construction one or more of the following measures shall be implemented to prevent flooding of adjacent property, prevent erosion and retain soil runoff on the site:
  1. Retention basins of sufficient size shall be utilized to retain storm water on the site;
  2. Where storm water is conveyed to a public drainage system, collection point, gutter, or similar disposal method, water shall be filtered by use of a barrier system, wattle or other method approved by the Department; or
  3. Compliance with City of Los Angeles' storm water management ordinance(s).
Construction plans shall indicate how the site grading or drainage system will manage all surface water flows to keep water from entering buildings. Examples of methods to manage surface water include, but are not limited to, the following:
  1. Swales
  2. Water collection and disposal systems
  3. French drains
  4. Water retention gardens
  5. Other water measures which keep surface water away from buildings and aid in groundwater recharge.
Exception: Additions and alterations not altering the drainage path.
New construction shall comply with Section 4.106.4.1, 4.106.4.2, or 4.106.4.3, to facilitate future installation and use of EV chargers. Electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) shall be installed in accordance with the California Electrical Code, Article 625.

Exceptions:
  1. On a case-by-case basis, where the local enforcing agency has determined EV charging and infrastructure are not feasible based upon one or more of the following conditions:
    1. Where there is no commercial power supply.
    2. Where there is evidence substantiating that meeting the requirements will alter the local utility infrastructure design requirements on the utility side of the meter so as to increase the utility side cost to the homeowner or the developer by more than $400.00 per dwelling unit.
  2. Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) and Junior Accessory Dwelling Units (JADU) without additional parking facilities.
For each dwelling unit, install a listed raceway to accommodate a dedicated 208/240-volt branch circuit. The raceway shall not be less than trade size 1 (nominal 1-inch inside diameter). The raceway shall originate at the main service or subpanel and shall terminate into a listed cabinet, box or other enclosure in close proximity to the proposed location of an EV charger. Raceways are required to be continuous at enclosed, inaccessible or concealed areas and spaces. The service panel and/or subpanel shall provide capacity to install a 40-ampere 208/240-volt minimum dedicated branch circuit and space(s) reserved to permit installation of a branch circuit overcurrent protective device.
Exception: A raceway is not required if a minimum 40-ampere 208/240-volt dedicated EV branch circuit is installed in close proximity to the proposed location of an EV charger at the time of original construction in accordance with the California Electrical Code.
The service panel or subpanel circuit directory shall identify the overcurrent protective device space(s) reserved for future EV charging as "EV CAPABLE". The raceway termination location shall be permanently and visibly marked as "EV CAPABLE".
Where multi-family dwelling units and other "R" occupancies are constructed on a building site, and parking is available, 30% of the total number of parking spaces provided, but in no case less than one space, shall be electric vehicle charging spaces (EV spaces) capable of supporting future electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE).

Calculations for the required number of EV spaces and electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) shall be rounded up to the nearest whole number.
Construction documents shall indicate the location of proposed EV spaces. Where common use parking is provided at least one EV space shall be located in the common use parking area and shall be available for use by all residents.
When EV chargers are installed, EV spaces required by Section 4.106.4.2.2, Item 3, shall comply with at least one of the following options:
  1. The EV space shall be located adjacent to an accessible parking space meeting the requirements of the California Building Code, Chapter 11A, to allow use of the EV charger from the accessible parking space.
  2. The EV space shall be located on an accessible route, as defined in the California Building Code, Chapter 2, to the building.
Exception: Electric vehicle charging stations designed and constructed in compliance with the California Building Code,Chapter 11B, are not required to comply with Section 4.106.4.2.1.1 and Section 4.106.4.2.2, Item 3.

Note: Electric vehicle charging stations serving public housing are required to comply with the California Building Code, Chapter 11 B.
The EV spaces shall be designed to comply with the following:
  1. The minimum length of each EV space shall be 18 feet (5486 mm).
  2. The minimum width of each EV space shall be 9 feet (2743 mm).
  3. One in every 25 EV spaces, but not less than one, shall also have an 8-foot (2438 mm) wide minimum aisle. A 5-foot (1524 mm) wide minimum aisle shall be permitted provided the minimum width of the EV space is 12 feet (3658 mm).
    1. Surface slope for this EV space and the aisle shall not exceed 1 unit vertical in 48 units horizontal (2.083 percent slope) in any direction.
Install a listed raceway capable of accommodating a 208/240-volt dedicated branch circuit. The raceway shall not be less than trade size 1 (nominal 1-inch inside diameter). The raceway shall originate at the main service or subpanel and shall terminate into a listed cabinet, box or enclosure in close proximity to the proposed location of the EV space. Construction documents shall identify the raceway termination point. The service panel and/or subpanel shall provide capacity to install a 40-ampere minimum dedicated branch circuit and space(s) reserved to permit installation of a branch circuit overcurrent protective device.
Exception: A raceway is not required if a minimum 40-ampere 208/240-volt dedicated EV branch circuit is installed in close proximity to the proposed location of an EV charger, at the time of original construction in accordance with the California Electrical Code.
Construction documents shall indicate the raceway termination point and proposed location of future EV spaces and EV chargers. Construction documents shall also provide information on amperage of future EVSE, raceway method(s), wiring schematics and electrical load calculations to verify that the electrical panel service capacity and electrical system, including any on-site distribution transformer(s), have sufficient capacity to simultaneously charge all EVs at all required EV spaces at the full rated amperage of the EVSE. Plan design shall be based upon a 40-ampere minimum branch circuit. Required raceways and related components that are planned to be installed underground, enclosed, inaccessible or in concealed areas and spaces shall be installed at the time of original construction.
Exception: A raceway is not required if a minimum 40-ampere 208/240-volt dedicated EV branch circuit is installed in close proximity to the proposed location of an EV charger, at the time of original construction in accordance with the California Electrical Code.
The service panel or subpanel circuit directory shall identify the overcurrent protective device space(s) reserved for future EV charging purposes as "EV CAPABLE" in accordance with the California Electrical Code.
All newly constructed hotels and motels shall provide EV spaces capable of supporting future installation of EVSE. The construction documents shall identify the location of the EV spaces.

Notes:
  1. Construction documents are intended to demonstrate the project's capability and capacity for facilitating future EV charging.
  2. There is no requirement for EV spaces to be constructed or available until EV chargers are installed for use.
  3. A parking space served by electric vehicle supply equipment or designed as a future EV charging space shall count as at least one standard automobile parking space for the purpose of complying with any applicable minimum parking space requirements established by a local jurisdiction. See Vehicle Code Section 22511.2 for further details.
The number of required EV spaces at newly constructed hotels and motels shall be 30% of the total number of parking spaces provided, but in no case less than one, for all types of parking facilities. Calculations for the required number of EV spaces shall be rounded up to the nearest whole number.
The EV spaces shall be designed to comply with the following:
  1. The minimum length of each EV space shall be 18 feet (5486 mm).
  2. The minimum width of each EV space shall be 9 feet (2743 mm).
When a single EV space is required, the EV space shall be designed in accordance with Section 4.106.4.2.3.
When multiple EV spaces are required, the EV spaces shall be designed in accordance with Section 4.106.4.2.4.
The service panels or subpanels shall be identified in accordance with Section 4.106.4.2.5.
In addition to the requirements in Section 4.106.4.3, EV spaces for hotels/motels and all EVSE, when installed, shall comply with the accessibility provisions for EV charging stations in the California Building Code, Chapter 11B.
The number of EVCS shall be 10% of the total number of parking spaces provided for all new multi-family dwelling units, other "R" occupancies, hotels and motels. Calculations for the number of required EVCS shall be rounded up to the nearest whole number. The number of EVCS can be counted towards the total number of EV spaces required for the building required per Subsections 99.04.106.4.2 and 99.04.106.4.3.1.
Roofing material shall comply with both LAMC Subdivisions 99.04.106.5.1 and 99.04.106.5.2, or comply with LAMC Subdivision 99.04.106.5.3.
EXCEPTIONS:
  1. Roof repair as defined in Section 100.1(b) of the California Energy Code; or
  2. Roof replacement when the roof area being replaced is equal to or less than 50% of the total roof area;
  3. Roof replacement where solar systems are being installed; or
  4. Additions resulting in less than 500 square feet of added roof area or less than 50% of the total roof area, whichever is greater.
TABLE 99.04.106.5
ROOF SLOPE MINIMUM 3-YEAR
AGED SOLAR
REFLECTANCE
THERMAL
EMITTANCE
3 YEAR AGED SOLAR
REFLECTANCE INDEX
(SRI)
< 2:12 0.63 0.75 75
≥ 2:12 0.20 0.75 16
Roofing material shall have a minimum three-year aged solar reflectance equal to or greater than the values specified in LAMC Table 99.04.106.5. Solar reflectance shall be determined by testing by an approved agency in accordance with ASTM C1549, ASTM E1918 or CRRC-1. Solar reflectance values shall be based on the aged reflectance value of the roofing product or the equation in LAMC Section A4.106.5.1 if aged solar reflectance values are not available.
Roofing materials shall have an emittance value equal to or greater than those specified in LAMC Table 99.04.106.5. Thermal emittance shall be determined by testing by an approved agency in accordance with ASTM C1371, ASTM E408 or CRRC-1.
Roofing materials shall have a 3 year aged Solar Reflectance Index equal to or greater than those specified in LAMC Table 99.04.106.5. Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) shall be determined in accordance with ASTM E1980. Calculation of aged SRI may be based on either tested or calculated 3 year aged values of solar reflectance.
Reduce nonroof heat islands for 50% of pathways patios, driveways or other paved areas by using one or more of the methods listed.
  1. Use trees or other plantings to provide shade and that mature within 15 years of planting. Trees shall be suitable in mature size and environmental requirements for the site. Tree selection and placement shall consider location and size of areas to be shaded, location of utilities, views from the structure, distance to sidewalks and foundations, overhangs onto adjacent properties and streets; other infrastructure and adjacent to landscaping. In addition, shading shall not cast a shadow, as specified, on any neighboring solar collectors pursuant to California Public Resources Code Section 25981, et seq. (Solar Shade Control Act);
  2. Use high albedo materials with an initial solar reflectance value of at least .30 as determined in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards E1918 or C1549;
  3. Use open grid pavement system or pervious or permeable pavement system;
  4. Use solar panel arrays to create a canopy shade system; or
  5. Other methods of reducing heat island effects acceptable to the Department.
The provisions of this division shall establish means of conserving energy.
Buildings shall comply with the following:
  1. All one- and two-family dwellings shall comply with Sections 110.10(b)1A, 110.10(b)2, 110.10(b)3, 110.10(b)4, 110.10(c), 110.10(d) and 110.10(e) of the California Energy Code (CCR, Title 24, Part 6).
  2. All buildings, other than one- and two-family dwellings, shall comply with Sections 110.10(b) through 110.10(d) of the California Energy Code (CCR, Title 24, Part 6).
    EXCEPTIONS:
    1. Additions having less than 2,000 sq. ft. of new roof area.
    2. Alterations.
The provisions of this chapter shall establish the means of conserving water used indoors, outdoors and in wastewater conveyance.
Plumbing fixtures (water closets and urinals) and fittings (faucets and showerheads) shall comply with Sections 4.303.1.1, 4.303.1.2, 4.303.1.3, and 4.303.1.4.

Note: All noncompliant plumbing fixtures in any residential real property shall be replaced with water-conserving plumbing fixtures. Plumbing fixture replacement is required prior to issuance of a certificate of final completion, certificate of occupancy, or final permit approval by the local building department. See Civil Code Section 1101.1, et seq., for the definition of a noncompliant plumbing fixture, types of residential buildings affected and other important enactment dates.
The effective flush volume of all water closets shall not exceed 1.28 gallons per flush. Tank-type water closets shall be certified to the performance criteria of the U.S. EPA WaterSense Specification for Tank-type Toilets.
Note: The effective flush volume of dual flush toilets is defined as the composite, average flush volume of two reduced flushes and one full flush.
The effective flush volume of wall-mounted urinals shall not exceed 0.125 gallons per flush. The effective flush volume of all other urinals shall not exceed 0.5 gallons per flush.
Showerheads shall have a maximum flow rate of not more than 1.8 gallons per minute at 80 psi. Showerheads shall be certified to the performance criteria of the U.S. EPA WaterSense Specification for Showerheads.
When a shower is served by more than one showerhead, the combined flow rate of all showerheads and/or other shower outlets controlled by a single valve shall not exceed 1.8 gallons per minute at 80 psi, or the shower shall be designed to allow only one shower outlet to be in operation at a time.

Note: A hand-held shower shall be considered a showerhead.
The maximum flow rate of residential lavatory faucets shall not exceed 1.2 gallons per minute at 60 psi. The minimum flow rate of residential lavatory faucets shall not be less than 0.8 gallons per minute at 20 psi.
The maximum flow rate of lavatory faucets installed in common and public use areas (outside of dwellings or sleeping units) in residential buildings shall not exceed 0.5 gallons per minute at 60 psi.
Metering faucets when installed in residential buildings shall not deliver more than 0.2 gallons per cycle.
The maximum flow rate of kitchen faucets shall not exceed 1.8 gallons per minute at 60 psi. Kitchen faucets may temporarily increase the flow above the maximum rate, but not to exceed 2.2 gallons per minute at 60 psi, and must default to a maximum flow rate of 1.8 gallons per minute at 60 psi.
Note: Where complying faucets are unavailable, aerators or other means may be used to achieve reduction.
When installed, shall meet the requirements in the California Code of Regulations, Title 20 (Appliance Efficiency Regulations), Sections 1605.1(h)(4) Table H-2, Section 1605.3(h)(4)(A), and Section 1607(d)(7), and shall be equipped with an integral automatic shutoff.
FOR REFERENCE ONLY: The following table and code section have been reprinted from the California Code of Regulations, Title 20 (Appliance Efficiency Regulations), Section 1605.1(h)(4) and Section 1605.3(h)(4)(A).
TABLE H-2
STANDARDS FOR COMMERCIAL PRE-RINSE SPRAY VALVES MANUFACTURED ON OR AFTER JANUARY 28, 2019
PRODUCT CLASS
[spray force in ounce force (ozf)]
MAXIMUM FLOW
RATE (gpm) 
Product Class 1 (≤ 5.0 ozf)
1.00
Product Class 2 (> 5.0 ozf and ≤ 8.0 ozf)
1.20
Product Class 3 (> 8.0 ozf)
1.28
Title 20 Section 1605.3(h)(4)(A): Commercial prerinse spray valves manufactured on or after January 1, 2006, shall have a minimum spray force of not less than 4.0 ounces-force (ozf) [113 grams-force (gf)].
Submeters shall be installed to measure water usage of individual rental dwelling units in accordance with the California Plumbing Code.
Water submeters for multi-family dwellings shall comply with California Civil Code Section 1954.201, et seq. (2016 Cal. Stat. 623).
A 20 percent reduction in the overall use of potable water within the building shall be provided. The reduction shall be based on the maximum allowable water use per plumbing fixture and fittings as required by the Los Angeles Building Standards. The 20 percent reduction in potable water use shall be demonstrated by the following method:
A calculation demonstrating a 20% reduction in the building "water use baseline", as established in LAMC Table 99.04.303.4.1, shall be provided.
EXCEPTIONS:
  1. Projects with plumbing fixtures and fittings that comply with the maximum flow rate values in LAMC Table 99.04.303.4.2.
  2. Additions and alterations to buildings where the new fixtures and fittings comply with the maximum flow rate values in LAMC Table 99.04.303.4.2.
  3. Buildings utilizing recycled water in accordance with LAMC Subsection 99.04.305.2.
  4. Replacement of plumbing fixtures and fittings.
TABLE 99.04.303.4.1
WATER USE BASELINE3
FIXTURE TYPE BASELINE FLOW RATE DURATION DAILY USES OCCUPANTS2
Showerheads 1.8 gpm @ 80 psi 8 min 1 X2a
Lavatory Faucets, Residential 1.2 gpm @ 60 psi .25 min. 3 X
Lavatory Faucets, Common/Public Uses 0.5 gpm @ 60 psi .25 min.  3 X
Kitchen Faucets 1.8 gpm @ 60 psi 4 min.  1 X2b
Metering Faucets 0.20 gallons/cycle   3 X
Water Closets 1.28 gallons/flush 1 flush 1 male1 X
3 female
Urinals 0.125 gallons/flush 1 flush 2 male X

Fixture "Water Use" = Flow rate X Duration X Occupants X Daily uses
  1. The daily use number shall be increased to three if urinals are not installed in the room.
  2. Refer to Table A, Chapter 4 of the California Plumbing Code, for occupant load factors.
    1. Shower use by occupants depends on the type of use of a building or portion of a building. For example, the total occupant load for a health club, but only a fraction of the occupants in an office building as determined by the anticipated number of users.
    2. Kitchen faucet use is determined by the occupant load of the area served by the fixture.
  3. Use Worksheet WS-1 of the 2016 CALGreen Code to calculate baseline water.
TABLE 99.04.303.4.2
WATER REDUCTION FIXTURE FLOW RATES
FIXTURE TYPE  MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOW RATE
Kitchen Faucets* 1.5 gpm @ 60 psi
Clothes Washers ENERGY-STAR certified
Dishwashers ENERGY-STAR certified

*Kitchen faucets may temporarily increase the flow to 2.2 gpm at 60 psi, and must default to 1.5 gpm at 60 psi. This requirement does not apply to a faucet in commercial kitchens or in buildings that have water closets with a maximum flush rate of 1.06 gpf installed throughout.
Plumbing fixtures and fittings shall be installed in accordance with the California Plumbing Code, and shall meet the applicable standards referenced in Table 1701.1 of the California Plumbing Code.
Residential developments shall comply with a local water efficient landscape ordinance or the current California Department of Water Resources' Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO), whichever is more stringent.

Notes:
  1. The Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO) is located in the California Code of Regulations, Title 23, Chapter 2.7, Division 2.

    MWELO and supporting documents, including a water budget calculator, are available at: https:// www.water.ca.gov/
A landscape water meter provided by the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power shall be installed for landscape irrigation for the following:
  1. New construction projects, as defined by the California Department of Water Resources Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance, with aggregate landscape area over 500 square feet.
  2. When required by the California Department of Water Resources Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance.
  3. Additions and alterations, with a valuation of $200,000 or more, where the entire potable water system is replaced, including all underground piping to the existing meter.
Locks shall be installed on all publicly accessible exterior faucets and hose bibs.
EXCEPTION: Single family dwellings.
For one- and two-family dwellings, any permanently installed outdoor in-ground swimming pool or spa shall be equipped with a cover having a manual or power-operated reel system. For irregular-shaped pools where it is infeasible to cover 100 percent of the pool due to its irregular shape, a minimum of 80 percent of the pool shall be covered.
EXCEPTION: Additions or alterations to existing swimming pools and spas with a building valuation not exceeding $25,000.

Note: Safety pool covers installed pursuant to the exception to LAMC Subsection 91.3109.4 shall meet the requirements of ASTM F 1346.
When City-recycled water is available for use within 200 feet of the property line, 100 percent of water for water closets, urinals, floor drains, and process cooling and heating in that building shall come from Cityrecycled water. Recycled water systems shall be designed and installed in accordance with the Los Angeles Plumbing Code.
EXCEPTIONS:
  1. Additions that use any part of the existing plumbing system.
  2. Alterations that do not include replacing all of the potable water piping.
  3. Where City-recycled water quality has been deemed non-suitable for a particular fixture or equipment, connection to the City is not required. The fixture and/or equipment shall be dual-plumbed to allow for future connection.
Waste piping shall be arranged to permit the discharge from the clothes washer, bathtub, showers and bathroom/restroom washbasins to be used for a future graywater irrigation system(s). The flow from the fixtures shall be piped separately, and, at a minimum, be adequate to supply the irrigation demand as determined by the California Department of Water Resources' Model Water Efficiency Landscape Ordinance (MWELO). The point(s) of connection between graywater piping and other waste piping shall be accessible (as defined in LAMC Section 99.02.202) and provided with signage that is satisfactory to the Department.
EXCEPTIONS:
  1. Buildings with a graywater, rainwater harvesting, or other water reuse system.
  2. Sites with landscape areas not exceeding 500 square feet.
  3. Projects where graywater systems are not permitted due to geological conditions.
  4. Additions and alterations that use the existing building drain.
Cooling towers shall comply with LAMC Subdivision 99.04.305.3.1 or 99.04.305.3.2.
Buildings of 25 stories or less shall comply with one of the following:
  1. Cooling towers shall have a minimum of 6 cycles of concentration (blowdown); or
  2. A minimum of 50 percent of makeup water supply to cooling towers shall come from non-potable water sources, including treated backwash.
Buildings over 25 stories shall comply with all of the following:
  1. Cooling towers shall have a minimum of 6 cycles of concentration (blowdown); and
  2. 100 percent of makeup water supply to cooling towers shall come from non-potable water sources, including treated backwash.
EXCEPTION: Where the amount of graywater produced by the plumbing system is insufficient to meet the total makeup water demand, as determined by the Department, potable water can be used to compensate for the deficiency.
Where groundwater is being extracted and discharged, a system for onsite reuse of the groundwater shall be developed and constructed. Alternatively, the groundwater may be discharged to the sewer.
The provisions of this chapter shall outline means of achieving material conservation and resource efficiency through protection of buildings from exterior moisture; construction waste diversion; employment of techniques to reduce pollution through recycling of materials; and building commissioning or testing, adjusting and balancing.
Annular spaces around pipes, electric cables, conduits or other openings in sole/bottom plates at exterior walls shall be protected against the passage of rodents by closing such openings with cement mortar, concrete masonry or a similar method acceptable to the enforcing agency.
Provide flashing details on the building plans which comply with accepted industry standards or manufacturer's instructions at the following locations:
  1. Around windows and doors;
  2. Roof valleys;
  3. Chimneys to roof intersections.
Protect building materials delivered to the construction site from rain and other sources of moisture.
Comply with LAMC Section 66.32, et seq., of the Los Angeles Municipal Code.
Submit a construction waste management plan in conformance with Items 1 through 5. The construction waste management plan shall be updated as necessary and shall be available during construction for examination by the enforcing agency.
  1. Identify the construction and demolition waste materials to be diverted from disposal by recycling, reuse on the project or salvage for future use or sale.
  2. Specify if construction and demolition waste materials will be sorted on-site (source-separated) or bulk mixed (single stream).
  3. Identify diversion facilities where the construction and demolition waste material will be taken.
  4. Identify construction methods employed to reduce the amount of construction and demolition waste generated.
  5. Specify that the amount of construction and demolition waste materials diverted shall be calculated by weight or volume, but not by both.
Utilize a waste management company, approved by the enforcing agency, which can provide verifiable documentation that the percentage of construction and demolition waste material diverted from the landfill complies with Section 4.408.1.
Note: The owner or contractor may make the determination if the construction and demolition waste materials will be diverted by a waste management company.
Projects that generate a total combined weight of construction and demolition waste disposed of in landfills, which do not exceed 3.4 pounds per square foot of the building area shall meet the minimum 65 percent construction waste reduction requirement in Section 4.408.1.
Projects that generate a total combined weight of construction and demolition waste disposed of in landfills, which do not exceed 2 pounds per square foot of the building area, shall meet the minimum 65 percent construction waste reduction requirement in Section 4.408.1.
Documentation shall be provided to the enforcing agency which demonstrates compliance with Section 4.408.2, Items 1 through 5, Section 4.408.3 or Section 4.408.4.

Notes:
  1. Sample forms found in "A Guide to the California Green Building Standards Code (Residential)" located at http://www.hcd.ca.gov/building-standards/calgreen/cal-green-form.shtml may be used to assist in documenting compliance with this section.
  2. Mixed construction and demolition debris (C&D) processors can be located at the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle).
At the time of final inspection, a manual, compact disc, web-based reference or other media acceptable to the enforcing agency which includes all of the following shall be placed in the building:
  1. Directions to the owner or occupant that the manual shall remain with the building throughout the life cycle of the structure.
  2. Operation and maintenance instructions for the following:
    1. Equipment and appliances, including water-saving devices and systems, HVAC systems, photovoltaic systems, electric vehicle chargers, water-heating systems and other major appliances and equipment.
    2. Roof and yard drainage, including gutters and downspouts.
    3. Space conditioning systems, including condensers and air filters.
    4. Landscape irrigation systems.
    5. Water reuse systems.
  3. Information from local utility, water and waste recovery providers on methods to further reduce resource consumption, including recycle programs and locations.
  4. Public transportation and/or carpool options available in the area.
  5. Educational material on the positive impacts of an interior relative humidity between 30—60 percent and what methods an occupant may use to maintain the relative humidity level in that range.
  6. Information about water-conserving landscape and irrigation design and controllers which conserve water.
  7. Instructions for maintaining gutters and downspouts and the importance of diverting water at least 5 feet away from the foundation.
  8. Information on required routine maintenance measures, including, but not limited to, caulking, painting, grading around the building, etc.
  9. Information about state solar energy and incentive programs available.
  10. A copy of all special inspection verifications required by the enforcing agency or this code.
  11. Information from CAL FIRE on maintenance of defensible space around residential structures.
Where 5 or more multifamily dwelling units are constructed on a building site, provide readily accessible area(s) that serves all buildings on the site and are identified for the depositing, storage and collection of nonhazardous materials for recycling, including (at a minimum) paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, organic waste, and metals, or meet a lawfully enacted local recycling ordinance, if more restrictive.

Exception: Rural jurisdictions that meet and apply for the exemption in Public Resources Code Section 42649.82 (a)(2)(A) et seq. are not required to comply with the organic waste portion of this section.
The provisions of this chapter shall outline means of reducing the quantity of air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of a building's installers, occupants and neighbors.
Any installed gas fireplace shall be a direct-vent sealed-combustion type. Any installed woodstove or pellet stove shall comply with U.S. EPA New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) emission limits as applicable, and shall have a permanent label indicating they are certified to meet the emission limits. Woodstoves, pellet stoves and fireplaces shall also comply with applicable local ordinances.
At the time of rough installation, during storage on the construction site and until final startup of the heating, cooling and ventilating equipment, all duct and other related air distribution component openings shall be covered with tape, plastic, sheetmetal or other methods acceptable to the enforcing agency to reduce the amount of water, dust and debris, which may enter the system.

TABLE 4.504.1
ADHESIVE VOC LIMIT1, 2
Less Water and Less Exempt Compounds in Grams per Liter
ARCHITECTURAL APPLICATIONS VOC LIMIT
Indoor carpet adhesives 50
Carpet pad adhesives 50
Outdoor carpet adhesives 150
Wood flooring adhesives 100
Rubber floor adhesives 60
Subfloor adhesives 50
Ceramic tile adhesives 65
VCT and asphalt tile adhesives 50
Drywall and panel adhesives 50
Cove base adhesives 50
Multipurpose construction adhesives 70
Structural glazing adhesives 100
Single-ply roof membrane adhesives 250
Other adhesives not specifically listed 250
SPECIALTY APPLICATIONS  
PVC welding 510
CPVC welding 490
ABS welding 325
Plastic cement welding 100
Adhesive primer for plastic 550
Contact adhesive 80
Special purpose contact adhesive 250
Structural wood member adhesive 140
Top and trim adhesive 540
SUBSTRATE SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS  
Metal to metal 30
Plastic foams 50
Porous material (except wood) 50
Wood 30
Fiberglass 80
  1. If an adhesive is used to bond dissimilar substrates together, the adhesive with the highest VOC content shall be allowed.
  2. For additional information regarding methods to measure the VOC content specified in this table, see South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1168.
Finish materials shall comply with this section.

TABLE 4.504.2
SEALANT VOC LIMIT
Less Water and Less Exempt Compounds in Grams per Liter
SEALANTS VOC LIMIT
Architectural 50
Marine deck 760
Non-membrane roof 300
Roadway 250
Single-ply roof membrane 450
Other 420
SEALANT PRIMERS  
Architectural  
Nonporous
250
Porous
775
Modified bituminous 500
Marine deck 760
Other 750
Adhesives, sealants and caulks used on the project shall meet the requirements of the following standards unless more stringent local or regional air pollution or air quality management district rules apply:
  1. Adhesives, adhesive bonding primers, adhesive primers, sealants, sealant primers, and caulks shall comply with local or regional air pollution control or air quality management district rules where applicable or SCAQMD Rule 1168 VOC limits, as shown in Table 4.504.1 or 4.504.2, as applicable. Such products also shall comply with the Rule 1168 prohibition on the use of certain toxic compounds (chloroform, ethylene dichloride, methylene chloride, perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene), except for aerosol products, as specified in Subsection 2 below.
  2. Aerosol adhesives, and smaller unit sizes of adhesives, and sealant or caulking compounds (in units of product, less packaging, which do not weigh more than 1 pound and do not consist of more than 16 fluid ounces) shall comply with statewide VOC standards and other requirements, including prohibitions on use of certain toxic compounds, of California Code of Regulations, Title 17, commencing with Section 94507.
Architectural paints and coatings shall comply with VOC limits in Table 1 of the ARB Architectural Suggested Control Measure, as shown in Table 4.504.3, unless more stringent local limits apply. The VOC content limit for coatings that do not meet the definitions for the specialty coatings categories listed in Table 4.504.3 shall be determined by classifying the coating as a Flat, Nonflat or Nonflat-high Gloss coating, based on its gloss, as defined in subsections 4.21, 4.36, and 4.37 of the 2007 California Air Resources Board, Suggested Control Measure, and the corresponding Flat, Nonflat or Nonflat-high Gloss VOC limit in Table 4.504.3 shall apply.
Aerosol paints and coatings shall meet the Product-weighted MIR Limits for ROC in Section 94522(a)(2) and other requirements, including prohibitions on use of certain toxic compounds and ozone depleting substances, in Sections 94522(e)(1) and (f)(1) of California Code of Regulations, Title 17, commencing with Section 94520; and in areas under the jurisdiction of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District additionally comply with the percent VOC by weight of product limits of Regulation 8, Rule 49.
Verification of compliance with this section shall be provided at the request of the enforcing agency. Documentation may include, but is not limited to, the following:
  1. Manufacturer's product specification.
  2. Field verification of on-site product containers.
All carpet installed in the building interior shall meet the testing and product requirements of one of the following:
  1. Carpet and Rug Institute's Green Label Plus Program.
  2. California Department of Public Health, "Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources Using Environmental Chambers," Version 1.1, February 2010 (also known as Specification 01350.)
  3. NSF/ANSI 140 at the Gold level.
  4. Scientific Certifications Systems Indoor Advantage™ Gold.
TABLE 4.504.3
VOC CONTENT LIMITS FOR ARCHITECTURAL COATINGS2, 3
Grams of VOC per Liter of Coating Less Water and Less Exempt Compounds
COATING CATEGORY VOC LIMIT
Flat coatings 50
Nonflat coatings 50
Nonflat-high gloss coatings 50
SPECIALTY COATINGS  
Aluminum roof coatings 100
Basement specialty coatings 400
Bituminous roof coatings 50
Bituminous roof primers 350
Bond breakers 350
Concrete curing compounds 100
Concrete curing compounds, Roadways & Bridges 350
Concrete/masonry sealers 100
Driveway sealers 50
Dry fog coatings 50
Faux finishing coatings
Clear Top Coat
100
Decorative Coatings
350
Glazes
350
Japan
350
Trowel Applied Coatings
50
Fire resistive coatings 150
Floor coatings 50
Form-release compounds 100
Graphic arts coatings (sign paints) 200
High temperature coatings 420
Industrial maintenance coatings 100
Low solids coatings1 120
Magnesite cement coatings 450
Mastic texture coatings 100
Metallic pigmented coatings 150
Multicolor coatings 250
Pretreatment wash primers 420
Primers, sealers, and undercoaters 100
Reactive penetrating sealers 350
Recycled coatings 250
Roof coatings 50
Roof coatings, aluminum 100
Rust preventative coatings 100
Shellacs  
     Clear 730
     Opaque 550
Specialty primers, sealers and undercoaters 100
Stains 100
Stains, Interior 250
Stone consolidants 450
Swimming pool coatings 340
Traffic marking coatings 100
Tub and tile refinish coatings 420
Waterproofing membranes 100
Wood coatings 275
Wood preservatives 350
Zinc-rich primers 100
  1. Grams of VOC per liter of coating, including water and including exempt compounds.
  2. The specified limits remain in effect unless revised limits are listed in subsequent columns in the table.
  3. Values in this table are derived from those specified by the South Coast Air Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113. More information is available from the SCAQMD.
All carpet cushion installed in the building interior shall meet the requirements of the California Department of Public Health, "Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources Using Environmental Chambers," Version 1.2, January 2017 (Emission testing method for California Specification 01350).
See California Department of Public Health's website for certification programs and testing labs.
https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CCDPHP/DEODC/EHLB/IAQ/Pages/VOC.aspx
All carpet adhesive shall meet the requirements of Table 4.504.1.
Where resilient flooring is installed, at least 80 percent of floor area receiving resilient flooring shall meet the requirements of the California Department of Public Health, "Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources Using Environmental Chambers," Version 1.2, January 2017 (Emission testing method for California Specification 01350).
See California Department of Public Health's website for certification programs and testing labs.
https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CCDPHP/DEODC/EHLB/IAQ/Pages/VOC.aspx
Hardwood plywood, particleboard and medium density fiberboard composite wood products used on the interior or exterior of the building shall meet the requirements for formaldehyde as specified in ARB's Air Toxics Control Measure for Composite Wood (17 CCR 93120 et seq.) as shown in Table 4.504.5.
TABLE 4.504.5
FORMALDEHYDE LIMITS1
Maximum Formaldehyde Emissions in Parts per Million
PRODUCTCURRENT LIMIT
Hardwood plywood veneer core0.05
Hardwood plywood composite core0.05
Particleboard0.09
Medium density fiberboard0.11
Thin medium density fiberboard20.13
  1. Values in this table are derived from those specified by the California Air Resources Board, Air Toxics Control Measure for Composite Wood as tested in accordance with ASTM E1333. For additional information, see California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Sections 93120 through 93120.12.
  2. Thin medium density fiberboard has a maximum thickness of 5/16 inch (8 mm).
Verification of compliance with this section shall be provided as requested by the enforcing agency. Documentation shall include at least one of the following:
  1. Product certifications and specifications.
  2. Chain of custody certifications.
  3. Product labeled and invoiced as meeting the Composite Wood Products regulation (see CCR, Title 17, Section 93120, et seq.).
  4. Exterior grade products marked as meeting the PS-1 or PS-2 standards of the Engineered Wood Association, the Australian AS/NZS 2269, European 636 3S, and Canadian CSA O121, CSA O151, CSA O153 and CSA O325 standards.
  5. Other methods acceptable to the enforcing agency.
Mechanically ventilated buildings shall meet the air filtration requirements of the 2019 California Energy Code.
Buildings shall meet or exceed the provisions of the California Building Standards Code.
Concrete slab foundations required to have a vapor retarder by the California Building Code Chapter 19 or concrete slab-on-ground floors required to have a vapor retarder by the California Residential Code, Chapter 5, shall also comply with this section.
A capillary break shall be installed in compliance with at least one of the following:
  1. A 4-inch-thick (101.6 mm) base of 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) or larger clean aggregate shall be provided with a vapor retarder in direct contact with concrete and a concrete mix design, which will address bleeding, shrinkage, and curling, shall be used. For additional information, see American Concrete Institute, ACI 302.2R-06.
  2. Other equivalent methods approved by the enforcing agency.
  3. A slab design specified by a licensed design professional.
Building materials with visible signs of water damage shall not be installed. Wall and floor framing shall not be enclosed when the framing members exceed 19 percent moisture content. Moisture content shall be verified in compliance with the following:
  1. Moisture content shall be determined with either a probe-type or contact-type moisture meter. Equivalent moisture verification methods may be approved by the enforcing agency and shall satisfy requirements found in Section 101.8 of this code.
  2. Moisture readings shall be taken at a point 2 feet (610 mm) to 4 feet (1219 mm) from the grade stamped end of each piece to be verified.
  3. At least three random moisture readings shall be performed on wall and floor framing with documentation acceptable to the enforcing agency provided at the time of approval to enclose the wall and floor framing.
Insulation products which are visibly wet or have a high moisture content shall be replaced or allowed to dry prior to enclosure in wall or floor cavities. Wet-applied insulation products shall follow the manufacturers' drying recommendations prior to enclosure.
Each bathroom shall be mechanically ventilated and shall comply with the following:
  1. Fans shall be ENERGY STAR compliant and be ducted to terminate outside the building.
  2. Unless functioning as a component of a whole house ventilation system, fans must be controlled by a humidity control.
    1. Humidity controls shall be capable of adjustment between a relative humidity range of ≤ 50 percent to a maximum of 80 percent. A humidity control may utilize manual or automatic means of adjustment.
    2. A humidity control may be a separate component to the exhaust fan and is not required to be integral (i.e., built-in).
Notes:
  1. For the purposes of this section, a bathroom is a room which contains a bathtub, shower, or tub/ shower combination.
  2. Lighting integral to bathroom exhaust fans shall comply with the California Energy Code.
Heating and air-conditioning systems shall be sized, designed and have their equipment selected using the following methods:
  1. The heat loss and heat gain is established according to ANSI/ACCA 2 Manual J—2016 (Residential Load Calculation), ASHRAE handbooks or other equivalent design software or methods.
  2. Duct systems are sized according to ANSI/ACCA 1 Manual D—2016 (Residential Duct Systems), ASHRAE handbooks or other equivalent design software or methods.
  3. Select heating and cooling equipment according to ANSI/ACCA 3 Manual S—2014 (Residential Equipment Selection) or other equivalent design software or methods.
Exception: Use of alternate design temperatures necessary to ensure the systems function are acceptable.