ADOPTS WITH AMENDMENTS:

International Fire Code 2012 (IFC 2012)

Heads up: There are no amended sections in this chapter.

Appendix VI-F Recommended Separation Distances for Explosive Materials (See Chapter 33)

AMENDMENT
This section has been amended at the state or city level.
The following information is provided as reference information for application of Chapter 56 and IC 22-11-14. The information provided in Section 1 is excerpted from federal regulations in 49 CFR, Parts 171-173. A discussion of the new regulations is also provided.

Table A-VI-F-5 is reprinted with permission of the Institute of Makers of Explosives with the provision that the entire table, complete with all explanatory footnotes, is printed. Table A-VI-F-5 is used for magazines containing high explosives or a combination of high explosives and low explosives, and for magazines containing blasting agents.

TABLE A-VI-F-2 - DEFINITIONS FOR DIVISIONS OF CLASS 1 (EXPLOSIVE) MATERIALS
DIVISION DEFINITION
1.1 Explosives that have a mass hazard explosion. A mass explosion is one that affects almost the entire load instantaneously. (Examples include dynamite, cap-sensitive water gels, slurries, emulsions, and cast boosters.)
1.2 Explosives that have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard. (Examples include ammunition, projectiles, and bombs.)
1.3 Explosives that have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard or both, but not a mass explosion hazard. (Examples include some propellants, some fireworks, and flares.)
1.4 Explosive devices that present a minor explosion hazard. External fire must not cause virtually instantaneous explosion of almost the entire contents of the package. (Examples include some detonators and detonating cords, safety fuse, electric squibs, igniters, igniting cord, and some fireworks.)
1.5 Very insensitive explosives. This division is comprised of substances that have a mass explosion hazard but are so insensitive that there is very little probability of initiation or of transition from burning to detonation under normal conditions of transport. (Examples include blasting agents.)
1.6 Extremely incentive articles that do not have a mass explosion hazard. This division is comprised of articles that contain only extremely insensitive detonation substances and that demonstrate a negligible probability of accidental initiation or propagation. (This division is not commonly used for commercial explosives.)

TABLE A-VI-F-3 - COMPARISON OF OLD TO CURRENT EXPLOSIVES CLASSIFICATIONS
CLASS A EXPLOSIVES May be either DIVISION 1.1 or 1.2 depending on the material
CLASS B EXPLOSIVES May be either DIVISION 1.2 or 1.3 depending on the material
CLASS C EXPLOSIVES DIVISION 1.4
BLASTING AGENTS DIVISION 1.5
(NO APPLICABLE CLASS) DIVISION 1.6

TABLE A-VI-F-4 - EXPLOSIVES COMPATIBILITY GROUPS
DESCRIPTION OF SUBSTANCES OR ARTICLE TO BE CLASSIFIED COMPATIBILITY GROUP CLASSIFICATION CODE
Primary explosive substance. A 1.1A
Article containing a primary explosive substance and not containing two or more effective protective substances. B 1.1B, 1.2B, 1.4B
Propellant explosive substance or other deflagrating explosive substance or article containing such explosive substance. C 1.1C, 1.2C, 1.3C, 1.4C
Secondary detonating explosive substance or black powder or article containing a secondary detonating explosive substance, in each case without means of initiation and without a propelling charge, or article containing a primary explosive substance and containing two or more effective protective features. D 1.1D, 1.2D, 1.4D, 1.5D
Article containing a secondary detonating explosive substance, without means of initiation, with a propelling charge (other than one containing flammable liquid or hypergolic liquid). E 1.1E, 1.2E, 1.4E
Article containing a secondary detonating explosive substance with its means of initiation, with a propelling charge (other than one containing flammable liquid or hypergolic liquid) or without a propelling charge. F 1.1F, 1.2F, 1.3F, 1.4F
Pyrotechnic substance or article containing a pyrotechnic substance, or article containing both an explosive substance and an illuminating, incendiary, tear-producing or smoke-producing substance (other than a water-activated article or one containing white phosphorus, phosphide, or flammable liquid or gel or hypergolic liquid). G 1.1G, 1.2G, 1.3G, 1.4G
Article containing both an explosive substance and white phosphorus. H 1.2H,1.3H
Article containing both an explosive substance and flammable liquid or gel. J 1.1J, 1.2J, 1.3J
Article containing both an explosive substance and a toxic chemical agent. K 1.2K, 1.3K
Explosive substance or article containing an explosive substance and presenting a special risk (e.g., due to water-activation or presence of hypergolic liquids, phosphides, or pyrophoric substances) needing isolation of each type. L 1.1L, 1.2L, 1.3L
Articles containing only extremely insensitive detonating substances. N 1.6N
Substance or article so packed or designed that any hazardous effects arising from accidental functioning are limited to the extent that they do not significantly hinder or prohibit firefighting or other emergency response efforts in the immediate vicinity of the package. S 1.4S


TABLE A-VI-F-5 - AMERICAN TABLE OF DISTANCES FOR STORAGE OF EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS
As Revised and Approved by the Institute of Makers of Explosives - June 199114
QUANTITY OF EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS1 2 3 4 15 DISTANCES IN FEET
x 304.8 Per mm
Inhabited Buildings9
Public Highways with Traffic Volume of less than 3,000 Vehicles per Day
Passenger Railways - Public Highways with Traffic Volume of more than 3,000 Vehicles/Day10 11 Separation of Magazines5 12
Pounds Over Pounds Not Over Barricaded6 7 8 Unbarricaded Barricaded6 7 8 Unbarricaded Barricaded6 7 8 Unbarricaded Barricaded6 7 8 Unbarricaded
x 0.454 Per kg
0 5 70 140 30 60 51 102 6 12
5 10 90 180 35 70 64 128 8 16
10 20 110 220 45 90 81 162 10 20
20 30 125 250 50 100 93 186 11 22
30 40 140 280 55 110 103 206 12 24
40 50 150 300 60 120 110 220 14 28
50 75 170 340 70 140 127 254 15 30
75 100 190 380 75 150 139 278 16 32
100 125 200 400 80 160 150 300 18 36
125 150 215 430 85 170 159 318 19 38
150 200 235 470 95 190 175 350 21 42
200 250 255 510 105 210 189 378 23 46
250 300 270 540 110 220 201 402 24 48
300 400 295 590 120 240 221 442 27 54
400 500 320 640 130 260 238 476 29 58
500 600 340 680 135 270 253 506 31 62
600 700 355 710 145 290 266 522 32 64
700 800 375 750 150 300 278 556 33 66
800 900 390 780 155 310 289 578 34 68
900 1,000 400 800 160 320 300 600 36 72
1,000 1,200 425 850 165 330 318 636 39 78
1,200 1,400 450 900 170 340 336 672 41 82
1,400 1,600 470 940 175 350 351 702 43 86
1,600 1,800 490 980 180 360 366 732 44 88
1,800 2,000 505 1,010 185 370 378 756 45 90
2,000 2,500 545 1,090 190 380 408 816 49 98
2,500 3,000 580 1,160 195 390 432 864 52 104
3,000 4,000 635 1,270 210 420 474 949 58 116
4,000 5,000 685 1,370 225 450 513 1,026 61 122
5,000 6,000 730 1,460 235 470 546 1,092 65 130
6,000 7,000 770 1,540 245 490 573 1,146 68 136
7,000 8,000 800 1,600 250 500 600 1,200 72 144
8,000 9,000 835 1,670 255 510 624 1,248 75 150
9,000 10,000 865 1,730 260 520 645 1,290 78 156
10,000 12,000 875 1,750 270 520 687 1,374 82 164
12,000 14,000 885 1,770 275 550 723 1,446 87 174
14,000 16,000 900 1,800 280 560 756 1,512 90 180
16,000 18,000 940 1,880 285 570 786 1,572 94 188
18,000 20,000 975 1,950 290 580 813 1,626 98 196
20,000 25,000 1,055 2,000 315 630 876 1,752 105 210
25,000 30,000 1,130 2,000 340 680 933 1,866 112 224
30,000 35,000 1,205 2,000 360 720 981 1,962 119 238
35,000 40,000 1,275 2,000 380 760 1,026 2,000 124 248
40,000 45,000 1,340 2,000 400 800 1,068 2,000 129 258
45,000 50,000 1,400 2,000 420 840 1,104 2,000 135 270
50,000 55,000 1,460 2,000 440 880 1,140 2,000 140 280
55,000 60,000 1,515 2,000 455 910 1,173 2,000 145 290
60,000 65,000 1,565 2,000 470 940 1,206 2,000 150 300
65,000 70,000 1,610 2,000 485 970 1,236 2,000 155 310
70,000 75,000 1,655 2,000 500 1,000 1,263 2,000 160 320
75,000 80,000 1,695 2,000 510 1,020 1,293 2,000 165 330
80,000 85,000 1,730 2,000 520 1,040 1,317 2,000 170 340
85,000 90,000 1,760 2,000 530 1,060 1,344 2,000 175 350
90,000 95,000 1,790 2,000 540 1,080 1,368 2,000 180 360
95,000 100,000 1,815 2,000 545 1,090 1,392 2,000 185 370
100,000 110,000 1,835 2,000 550 1,100 1,437 2,000 195 390
110,000 120,000 1,855 2,000 555 1,110 1,479 2,000 205 410
120,000 130,000 1,875 2,000 560 1,120 1,521 2,000 215 430
130,000 140,000 1,890 2,000 565 1,130 1,557 2,000 225 450
140,000 150,000 1,900 2,000 570 1,140 1,593 2,000 235 470
150,000 160,000 1,935 2,000 580 1,160 1,629 1,866 245 490
160,000 170,000 1,990 2,000 590 1,180 1,662 1,962 255 510
170,000 180,000 2,010 2,000 600 1,200 1,695 2,000 265 530
180,000 190,000 2,030 2,000 605 1,210 1,725 2,000 275 550
190,000 200,000 2,055 2,000 610 1,220 1,755 2,000 285 570
205,000 210,000 2,055 2,000 620 1,240 1,762 2,000 295 590
210,000 230,000 2,100 2,000 635 1,270 1,836 2,000 315 630
230,000 250,000 2,155 2,000 650 1,300 1,890 2,000 335 670
250,000 275,000 2,215 2,000 670 1,340 1,950 2,000 360 720
275,000 300,00013 2,275 2,000 690 1,380 2,000 2,000 385 770
  1. 1 "Explosive materials" means explosives, blasting agents and detonators.
  2. 2 "Explosives" means any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. A list of explosives determined to be within the coverage of 18 U.S.C. Chapter 40, Importation, Manufacturer, Distribution and Storage of Explosive Materials, is issued at least annually by the director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of the Department of the Treasury. For quantity and distance purposes, detonating cord of 50 grains per foot (10.7g/m) should be calculated as equivalent to 8 pounds (3.6 kg) of high explosives per 1,000 feet (304.8 m). Heavier or lighter core loads should be rated proportionately.
  3. 3 "Blasting agents" means any material or mixture, consisting of fuel and oxidizer, intended for blasting, not otherwise defined as an explosive, provided that the finished product, as mixed for use or shipment, cannot be detonated by means of a No. 8 test blasting cap when unconfined.
  4. 4 "Detonator" means any device containing any initiating or primary explosive that is used for initiating detonation. A detonator may not contain more than 10 grams of total explosives by weight, excluding ignition or delay charges. The term includes, but is not limited to, electric blasting caps of instantaneous and delay types, blasting caps for use within safety fuses, detonating cord delay connectors, and non-electric instantaneous and delay blasting caps which use detonating cord, shock tube or any other replacement for electric leg wires. All types of detonators in strengths through No. 8 cap should be rated at 1 1/2 pounds (0.68 kg) of explosives per 1,000 caps. For strengths higher than No. 8 cap, consult the manufacturer.
  5. 5 "Magazine" means any building, structure, or container, other than an explosives manufacturing building, approved for the storage of explosive materials.
  6. 6 "Natural barricade" means natural features of the ground such as hills, or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding exposure which require protection cannot be seen from the magazine when the trees are bare of leaves.
  7. 7 "Artificial barricade" means an artificial mound or riveted wall of earth of a minimum thickness of 3 feet (914.4 mm).
  8. 8 "Barricaded" means the effective screening of a building containing explosive materials from the magazine or other building, railway or highway by a natural.
  9. 9 "Inhabited building" means a building regularly occupied in whole or part as a habitation for human beings, or any church, schoolhouse, railroad station, store, or other structure where people are accustomed to assemble, except any building or structure occupied in connection with the manufacture, transportation, storage, or use of explosive materials.
  10. 10 "Railway" means any steam, electric, or other railroad or railway that carries passengers for hire.
  11. 11 "Highway" means any public street, public alley, or public road.
  12. 12 When two or more storage magazines are located on the same property, each magazine must comply with the minimum distances specified from inhabited buildings, railways, and highways, and in addition, they should be separated from each other by not less than the distances shown for "Separation of Magazines", except that the quantity of explosive materials contained in detonator magazines shall govern in regard to the spacing of said detonator magazines from magazines containing other explosive materials. If any two or more magazines are separated from each other by less than the specified "Separation of Magazines" distances, then such two or more magazines, as a group, must be considered as one magazine, and the total quantity of explosive materials stored in such group must be treated as if stored in a single magazine located on the site of any magazine of the group and must comply with the minimum of distances specified from other magazines, inhabited buildings, railways, and highways.
  13. 13 Storage in excess of 300,000 pounds (136,077.6 kg) of explosive materials in one magazine is generally not required for commercial enterprises.
  14. 14 This table applies only to the manufacture and permanent storage of commercial explosive materials. It is not applicable to transportation of explosives or any handling or temporary storage necessary or incidental thereto. It is not intended to apply to bombs, projectiles, or other heavily encased explosives.
  15. 15 When a manufacturing building on an explosive materials plant site is designed to contain explosive materials, such building shall be located from inhabited buildings, public highways, and passenger railways in accordance with Table A-VI-F-5 based on the maximum quantity of explosive materials permitted to be in the building at one time.
NOTE: The American Table of Distances (Table A-VI-F-5) is reprinted by permission of the Institute of Makers of Explosives with the provision that the entire table, complete with all explanatory footnotes, be printed.

TABLE A-VI-F-6 - TABLE OF RECOMMENDED SEPARATION DISTANCES OF AMMONIUM
NITRATE AND BLASTING AGENTS FROM EXPLOSIVES OR BLASTING AGENTS1 6
DONOR WEIGHT MINIMUM SEPARATION DISTANCE OF ACCEPTOR WHEN BARRICADED2 (feet) MINIMUM THICKNESS OF ARTIFICIAL BARRICADES5 (inches)
Pounds Over Pounds Not Over X 304.8 Per mm
X 0.484 Per kg Ammonium Nitrate3 Blasting Agent4 X 25.4 Per mm
  100 3 11 12
100 300 4 14 12
300 600 5 18 12
600 1,000 6 22 12
1,000 1,600 7 25 12
1,600 2,000 8 29 12
2,000 3,000 9 32 15
3,000 4,000 10 36 15
4,000 6,000 11 40 15
6,000 8,000 12 42 20
8,000 10,000 13 47 20
10,000 12,000 14 50 20
12,000 16,000 15 54 25
16,000 20,000 16 58 25
20,000 25,000 18 65 25
25,000 30,000 19 68 30
30,000 35,000 20 72 30
35,000 40,000 21 76 30
40,000 45,000 22 79 35
45,000 50,000 23 83 35
50,000 55,000 24 86 35
55,000 60,000 25 90 35
60,000 70,000 26 94 40
70,000 80,000 28 101 40
80,000 90,000 30 108 40
90,000 100,000 32 115 40
100,000 120,000 34 122 50
120,000 140,000 37 133 50
140,000 160,000 40 144 50
160,000 180,000 44 158 50
180,000 200,000 48 173 50
200,000 220,000 52 187 60
220,000 250,000 56 202 60
250,000 275,000 60 216 60
275,000 300,000 64 230 60
  1. 1 Recommended separation distances to prevent explosion of ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate-based agents by propagation from nearby stores of high explosives or blasting agents referred to in Table A-VI-F-6 as the "donor." Ammonium nitrate, by itself, is not considered to be a donor when applying Table A-1 Recommended separation distances to prevent explosion of ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate-based agents by propagation from nearby stores of high explosives or blasting agents referred to in Table A-VI-F-6 as the "donor." Ammonium nitrate, by itself, is not considered to be a donor when applying Table A-VI-F-6, Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, or combination thereof are acceptors. If stores of ammonium nitrate are located within the sympathetic detonation distance of explosives or blasting agents, one-half the mass of the ammonium nitrate should be included in the mass of the donor.
  2. 2 When the ammonium nitrate or blasting agent is not barricaded, the distances shown in Table A-VI-F-6 shall be multiplied by six. These distances allow for the possibility of high velocity metal fragments from mixers, hoppers, truck bodies, sheet metal structures, metal containers, and the like that may enclose the "donor." Where storage is in bullet resistant magazines recommended for explosives or where the storage is protected by a bullet resistant wall, distances and barricade thicknesses in excess of those prescribed in Table A-VI-F-5, Footnote 7, are not required. For construction of bullet resistant magazines, see Article 77.
  3. 3 The distances in Table A-VI-F-6 apply to ammonium nitrate that passes the insensitivity test prescribed in the definition of ammonium nitrate fertilizer promulgated by the Fertilizer Institute (Definitions and Test Procedure for Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer, Fertilizer Institute 1964); and ammonium nitrate failing to pass said test shall be stored at separation distances determined by competent persons and approved by the authority having jurisdiction.
  4. 4 These distances apply to blasting agents which pass the insensitivity test prescribed in regulations of the United States Department of Transportation and the United States Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
  5. 5 Earth, or sand dikes, or enclosures filled with the prescribed minimum thickness of earth or sand are acceptable artificial barricades. Natural barricades, such as hills or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding exposure which requires protection cannot be seen from the "donor" when the trees are bare of leaves, are also acceptable.
  6. 6 For determining the distances to be maintained from inhabited buildings, passenger railways, and public highways, see Table A-VI-F-5 (High Explosives and Blasting Agents) or Table A-VI-F-7 (Low Explosives).


TABLE A-VI-F-7
TABLE OF DISTANCES FOR STORAGE OF LOW EXPLOSIVES
LOW EXPLOSIVES (pounds) FROM INHABITED BUILDING DISTANCE (feet) FROM PUBLIC RAILROAD AND HIGHWAY DISTANCE (feet) FROM ABOVEGROUND MAGAZINE (feet)
X 0.484 per kg
Over Not Over × 304.3 per cm
0 1,000 75 75 60
1,000 5,000 115 115 75
5,000 10,000 130 130 100
10,000 20,000 180 180 125
20,000 30,000 215 215 145
30,000 40,000 235 235 155
40,000 50,000 250 250 165
50,000 60,000 260 260 175
60,000 70,000 270 270 185
70,000 80,000 300 300 190
80,000 90,000 325 325 195
90,000 100,000 350 350 200
100,000 200,000 375 375 250
200,000 300,000 400 400 300


TABLE A-VI-F-8 - DISTANCES FOR THE OPEN BURNING OF EXPLOSIVES1
QUANTITY OF EXPLOSIVES2 3 4 5 (Not Over) MINIMUM DISTANCE IN FEET
× 304.8 Per mm
Inhabited Buildings9 Public Highways with Traffic Volume of less than 3,000 Vehicles per Day Passenger Railways and Public Highways with Traffic Volumes more than 3,000 Vehicles per Day10 11 Separation From Other Open Burning Units
Pounds No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade6 7 8 No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade
X 0.484 Per kg
10 90 180 35 70 64 128 8
20 110 220 45 90 81 162 10
50 150 300 60 120 110 220 14
75 170 340 70 140 127 254 15
100 190 380 75 150 139 278 16
250 255 510 105 210 189 378 23
500 320 640 130 260 238 476 29
1,000 400 800 160 320 300 600 36
1,600 470 940 175 350 351 702 43
2,000 505 1,010 185 370 378 756 45
2,500 545 1,090 190 380 408 816 49
3,000 580 1,160 195 390 432 864 52
4,000 635 1,270 210 420 474 948 58
5,000 685 1,370 225 450 513 1,026 61
6,000 730 1,460 235 470 546 1,092 65
7,000 770 1,540 245 490 573 1,146 68
8,000 800 1,600 250 500 600 1,200 72
9,000 835 1,670 255 510 624 1,248 75
10,000 865 1,730 260 520 645 1,290 78
  1. 1 This table is intended only for application of open burning of commercial explosive materials. The distances stated in this table should be measured from the center of the unit, except for separations from other open-burning units, which are measured from the edge of the unit.
  2. 2 "Explosive materials" means any explosive, slurry, emulsion, detonating cord, blasting agents, and detonators.
  3. 3 "Explosives" means any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. A list of explosives determined to be within the coverage of 18 U.S.C. Chapter 40, Importation, Manufacture, Distribution and Storage of Explosive Material, is issued at least annually by the director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms of the Department of the Treasury. For quantity and distance purposes, detonating cord of 50 grains per foot (10.7 g/m) should be calculated as equivalent to 8 pounds (3.6 kg) of high explosives per 1,000 feet (304.8 m). Heavier or lighter core loads should be rated proportionally.
  4. 4 "Blasting agents" means any material or mixture, consisting of fuel and oxidizer, intended for blasting, not otherwise defined as an explosive, provided the finished product, as mixed for use or shipment, cannot be detonated by means of a No. 8 test blasting cap when unconfined.
  5. 5 "Detonator" means any device containing any initiating or primary explosive that is used for initiating detonation. A detonator may not contain more than 10 grams of total explosives by weight, excluding ignition or delay charges. The term includes, but is not limited to, electric blasting caps of instantaneous and delay blasting caps that use detonating cord, shock tube, or any other replacement for electric wires. All types of detonators in strengths through No. 8 cap should be rated at 1 1/2 pounds (0.68 kg) of explosives per 1,000 caps. For strengths higher than No. 8 cap, consult the manufacturer.
  6. 6 "Natural barricade" means natural features of the ground, such as hills, or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding exposures that require protection cannot be seen from the magazine when the trees are bare of leaves.
  7. 7 "Artificial barricade" means an artificial mound or riveted wall of earth of a minimum thickness of 3 feet (914.4 mm).
  8. 8 "Barricaded" means the effective screening of a building containing explosive materials from the magazine or other building, OB/OD site, railway, or highway by a natural or an artificial barrier. A straight line from the top of any sidewall of the building containing explosive materials to the eave line of any magazine or other building or to a point 12 feet (3,657.6 mm) above the center of a railway or highway shall pass through such a barrier.
  9. 9 "Inhabited building" means a building, regularly occupied in whole or part as a habitation for human beings, or any church, schoolhouse, railroad station, store, or other structure where people are accustomed to assemble. This does not mean any office, warehouse, production, laboratory, or other buildings that are a part of the facility where the open burning or open detonation sites are located.
  10. 10 "Highway" means any public street, public alley, or public road.
  11. 11 "Railway" means any steam, electric, or other railroad or railway that carries passengers for hire.


TABLE A-VI-F-9 - DISTANCES FOR THE OPEN DETONATION OF EXPLOSIVES1
QUANTITY OF EXPLOSIVES2 3 4 5 (Not Over) MINIMUM DISTANCE IN FEET
X 304.8 Per mm
Inhabited Buildings9 Public Highways with Traffic Volume of less than 3,000 Vehicles per Day Passenger Railways and Public Highways with Traffic Volumes more than 3,000 Vehicles per Day10 11 Separation From Other Open Detonation Units
Pounds No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade6 7 8 No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade6 7 8 No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade6 7 8 No Missile Hazard Missile Hazard Without Barricade6 7 8
1 730 730 325 325 480 480 6 12
2 920 920 410 410 600 600 6 12
5 1,250 1,250 550 550 820 820 6 12
10 1,600 1,600 695 695 1,030 1,030 8 16
20 1,990 1,990 875 875 1,295 1,295 10 20
50 2,700 2,700 1,190 1,190 1,760 1,760 14 28
75 3,080 3,080 1,360 1,360 2,015 2,015 15 30
100 3,400 3,400 1,500 1,500 2,220 2,220 16 32
150 3,900 3,900 1,715 1,715 2,535 2,535 19 38
200 4,275 4,275 1,890 1,890 2,795 2,795 21 42
300 4,900 4,900 2,160 2,160 3,200 3,200 24 48
400 5,400 5,400 2,380 2,380 3,520 3,520 27 54
500 5,800 5,800 2,560 2,560 3,790 3,790 29 58
  1. 1 This table is intended only for application of open burning of commercial explosive materials. The distances stated in this table should be measured from the center of the unit, except for separations from other open-burning units, which are measured from the edge of the unit.
  2. 2 "Explosive materials" means any explosive, slurry, emulsion, detonating cord, blasting agents, and detonators.
  3. 3 "Explosives" means any chemical compound, mixture or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. A list of explosives determined to be within the coverage of 18 U.S.C. Chapter 40, Importation, Manufacture, Distribution and Storage of Explosive Material, is issued at least annually by the director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms of the Department of the Treasury. For quantity and distance purposes, detonating cord of 50 grains per foot (10.7 g/m) should be calculated as equivalent to 8 pounds (3.6 kg) of high explosives per 1,000 feet (304.8 m). Heavier or lighter core loads should be rated proportionally.
  4. 4 "Blasting agents" means any material or mixture, consisting of fuel and oxidizer, intended for blasting, not otherwise defined as an explosive, provided the finished product, as mixed for use or shipment, cannot be detonated by means of a No. 8 test blasting cap when unconfined.
  5. 5 "Detonator" means any device containing any initiating or primary explosive that is used for initiating detonation. A detonator may not contain more than 10 grams of total explosives by weight, excluding ignition or delay charges. The term includes, but is not limited to, electric blasting caps of instantaneous and delay blasting caps that use detonating cord, shock tube, or any other replacement for electric wires. All types of detonators in strengths through No. 8 cap should be rated at 1 1/2 pounds (0.68 kg) of explosives per 1,000 caps. For strengths higher than No. 8 cap, consult the manufacturer.
  6. 6 "Natural barricade" means natural features of the ground, such as hills, or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding exposures that require protection cannot be seen from the magazine when the trees are bare of leaves.
  7. 7 "Artificial barricade" means an artificial mound or riveted wall of earth of a minimum thickness of 3 feet (914.4 mm).
  8. 8 "Barricaded" means the effective screening of a building containing explosive materials from the magazine or other building, OB/OD site, railway, or highway by a natural or an artificial barrier. A straight line from the top of any sidewall of the building containing explosive materials to the eave line of any magazine or other building or to a point 12 feet (3,657.6 mm) above the center of a railway or highway shall pass through such a barrier.
  9. 9 "Inhabited building" means a building, regularly occupied in whole or part as a habitation for human beings, or any church, schoolhouse, railroad station, store, or other structure where people are accustomed to assemble. This does not mean any office, warehouse, production, laboratory, or other buildings that are a part of the facility where the open burning or open detonation sites are located.
  10. 10 "Highway" means any public street, public alley, or public road.
  11. 11 "Railway" means any steam, electric, or other railroad or railway that carries passengers for hire.
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