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§4827-01 Storage of Hazardous Materials in Pre-Existing Facilities

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   (a)   Scope. This section consolidates the New York City Fire Prevention Code and former Fire Department rules in effect on June 30, 2008, that are applicable to the design and installation of hazardous material installations in pre-existing facilities.
   (b)   Definitions. The following terms shall, for purposes of this section and as used elsewhere in 3 RCNY Chapter 48, have the meanings shown herein:
      Retail drug store. A store or building used for the compounding and dispensing, usually in the form of physicians' prescriptions, or for the selling of small quantities of medicinal preparations, proprietary articles, drugs, chemicals, oils, volatile solvents and other substances which, alone or in combination with any other article or substance, are of a highly combustible, flammable or explosive nature. (Fire Prevention Code, former Administrative Code § 27-4002(35))
      Technical establishment. A building or place where explosive, flammable or highly combustible substances are produced, used or stored for use, or where chemicals or other materials entering into the production of such substances are stored or used, excepting those establishments which are specifically treated under other classifications in subchapters one through twenty-seven of this chapter. (Fire Prevention Code, former Administrative Code § 27-4002(39))
      Tenement house. A class A multiple dwelling as defined in subdivision four of section four of the multiple dwelling law. (Fire Prevention Code, former Administrative Code § 27-4002(40))
   (c)   General Provisions. Pre-existing facilities with hazardous material installations the design and installation of which would not be allowed or approved under the Fire Code, but which, pursuant to FC 102.3 and R102-01, may be continued with respect to such hazardous material installations under the applicable laws, rules and regulations in effect prior to the Fire Code, and shall continue to comply with the provisions of such laws, rules and regulations, including former Administrative Code §§ 27-4234, 27-4236, 27-4237, 27-4238, 27-4240, 27-4241, 27-4242 and 27-4246, and former Fire Department Rules §§ 10-01, 15-05 and 34-01, as applicable, until such time as such facilities may be required to comply with the Fire Code and the rules with respect to their design and installation.
   (d)   Technical Establishments.
      (1)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4234.
         § 27-4234 Restrictions. It shall be unlawful to store for use, or to use in any technical establishment any liquid acetylene, acetylide of copper or other metallic acetylide; fulminate of mercury, or any other fulminate or fulminating compound; nitroglycerine; chloride of nitrogen; amide or amine; blasting powder; smokeless powder; or gunpowder in any form; or any volatile product of petroleum (except rhigoline) having a boiling point lower than sixty degrees Fahrenheit.
   (e)   Wholesale Drug Stores and Drug and Chemical Supply Houses.
      (1)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4237.
         § 27-4237 Restrictions. No permit shall be issued for a wholesale drug store or drug and chemical supply house in any building:
         1.   Which is situated within fifty feet of the nearest wall of any building which is occupied as a school, hospital, theatre, or other place of public amusement or assembly;
         2.   Which is not equipped with a fire extinguishing system approved by the commissioner;
         3.   Where the building does not comply with the requirement of the building code regulating high hazard occupancies for buildings erected after the sixth day of December, nineteen hundred sixty-eight; or where a building or building section erected prior thereto is not fully equipped with an approved automatic sprinkler system.
      (2)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4238.
         § 27-4238 Laboratory.
         a.   Construction. The operation of compounding medicinal preparations, proprietary articles and similar materials, or analyzing or testing drugs, chemicals, medicinal preparations, proprietary articles and similar materials, when explosive or flammable substances are required, shall be conducted only in a room or part of the premises designed and constructed in accordance with all applicable provisions of the building code.
. . . . . . . . . .
      (3)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4240.
         § 27-4240 Prohibited materials. It shall be unlawful to manufacture or store in a wholesale drug store or drug and chemical supply house any of the following substances:
         1.   Acetylide of copper;
         2.   Amide or amine explosive;
         3.   Chloride of nitrogen;
         4.   Colored fire in any form;
         5.   Cymogene or any volatile product of petroleum (except rhigoline) or coal tar having a boiling point lower than sixty degrees Fahrenheit;
         6.   Flashlight powders;
         7.   Fulminate or any fulminating compound;
         8.   Guncotton;
         9.   Gunpowder in any form;
         10.   Liquid acetylene;
         11.   Nitro-glycerine, except in official U. S. pharmacopoeia solution, or in the form of pills, tablets, or granules containing not more than one-fiftieth of a grain each;
         12.   Picrates;
         13.   Potassium chlorate in admixture with organic substances or with phosphorus or sulphur; provided that this restriction shall not apply to the manufacture or storage of tablets of chlorate of potash intended for use solely for medicinal purposes;
         14.   Rubber shoddy.
      (4)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4241.
         § 27-4241 Quantities of supplies allowed. No permit shall be issued for the storage in a wholesale drug store or drug and chemical supply house of any of the following substances in quantities greater than those set forth in the following schedule:
1.   Explosives.
Amyl nitrate in bottles
25 pounds
Amyl nitrate in pearls
100 gross
Carbon bisulphide
50 pounds
Collodions
100 pounds in all
Gases, liquefied:
Anhydrous ammonia
2 cylinders
Carbon dioxide
2 cylinders
Nitrous oxide
2 cylinders
Oxygen
2 cylinders
Sulphur dioxide
2 cylinders
Nitroglycerine, one percent solution in alcohol
20 pounds
Picric acid
25 pounds
Soluble cotton
25 pounds in all
2.   Volatile flammable liquids (insoluble).
Benzine, benzole or naphthas of any kind
150 gallons in all
Coal tar
1 barrel
Coal tar oils (heavy)
10 barrels
Crude petroleum
1 barrel
Ethyl chloride and other ethers
200 pounds in all
Ether, nitrous
100 pounds in five pound packages or less
Ether, sulphuric
500 pounds
Rhigoline
2 dozen one pound tins
Varnishes, lacquers, etc.
275 gallons in all
Wood creosote
5 barrels
 3.   Volatile flammable liquids (soluble).
Acetone
1 barrel
Alcohol, denatured
10 barrels
Alcohol, ethyl
10 barrels
Alcohol, methyl
10 barrels
Aldehyde, ethyl
5 gallons
 4.   Non-volatile flammable liquids (insoluble).
Amyl acetate
10 barrels
Amyl alcohol
10 barrels
Aniline oil
5 drums
Cumol
5 barrels
Essential oils
10,000 pounds in all
Kerosene
1 barrel
Nitrobenzole
5 drums
Terebene
100 pounds
Toluol
350 pounds
Turpentine
10 barrels
Xylol
100 pounds
5.   Non-volatile flammable liquids (soluble).
Glycerine
5,000 pounds
6.   Combustible solids.
Metallic magnesium
100 pounds
Phosphorus
11 pounds
Phosphorus, red
11 pounds
Sulphur
25 barrels in all
7.   Gums, resins, pitch, etc.
Burgundy pitch
5,000 pounds
Camphor
8,000 pounds
Gum thus
5 barrels
Naphthaline
50 barrels in all
Pitch (coal tar pitch)
2 barrels
Resins, balsams and other varnish gums
8,000 pounds in all
Rosin
5 barrels
Shellac
2,500 pounds
Stockholm tar
1,000 pounds
Tar, refined (wood)
10 barrels
Venice turpentine
2,000 pounds
8.   Combustible fibres and powders (vegetable).
Cotton, absorbent
2,000 pounds
Cotton batting
10 bales
Excelsior
25 bales
Flax
20 bales
Jute
25 bales
Lampblack
10 barrels
Lycopodium
2,000 pounds
Oakum
2 bales
Pulverized charcoal
10 barrels
Sawdust
15 bags
Straw, packing
10 bales
9.   Dangerously corrosive acids.
Anhydrous acetic
500 pounds
Carbolic
15,000 pounds
Glacial acetic
2,000 pounds
Hydrochloric
15 carboys
Hydrofluoric
500 pounds
Sulphuric
15 carboys
10.   Acids.
Chromic
100 pounds
Iodic
5 pounds
Nitric
3 carboys
Nitric, fuming
25 pounds
Periodic
2 pounds
11.   Peroxides.
Barium
2 casks
Calcium
100 pounds
Hydrogen, U.S.P.
5,000 pounds
Other hydrogen peroxides, over three percent, not to exceed fifteen percent
500 pounds
Potassium
10 pounds
Sodium
25 pounds
12.   Chlorates.
Barium
500 pounds
Other metallic
100 pounds in all
Potassium
1,000 pounds
Sodium
1,000 pounds
13.   Perchlorates.
Potassium
10 pounds
Other metallic perchlorates
10 pounds in all
14.   Permanganates.
Potassium
1,000 pounds
Sodium
100 pounds
Other metallic permanganates
100 pounds in all
15.   Nitrates.
Barium
1,200 pounds
Bismuth subnitrate
2,500 pounds
Cobalt
1,000 pounds
Copper
100 pounds
Iron, ferric
200 pounds
Mercury (mercuric)
100 pounds
Mercury (mercurous)
10 pounds
Potassium
2,000 pounds
Silver
50 pounds
Sodium
1,000 pounds
Strontium
1,200 pounds
Other metallic
500 pounds in all
16.   Metallic oxides.
Lead binoxide
25 pounds
Lead (litharge)
1,200 pounds
Lead (red)
500 pounds
Mercury; yellow precipitate (mercurous)
200 pounds
Mercury; red precipitate (mercuric)
100 pounds
Silver
10 pounds
17.   Substances made dangerous by contact with other substances.
Calcium carbide
60 pounds
Metallic potassium
5 pounds
Metallic sodium
5 pounds
All other metals of the alkalies or alkalone earths
5 pounds in all
Phosphides
10 pounds
Unslaked lime
2 barrels
Zinc dust
100 pounds
The commissioner may, in his or her discretion and when no unusual hazard is presented thereby, authorize the storage of greater quantities than those set forth in the foregoing schedule, or the storage of other substances not specified therein.
      (5)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4242.
         § 27-4242 Storage.
         . . . . . . . . . .
         b.   Liquids. The storage of acids or liquid chemicals which may cause explosions or combustion by flowing into, upon or among chemicals or other substances, shall be provided with safety catch basins or a similar device, so that, in case of the leakage of such acids or liquids, no danger to life or property will result. Carboys containing nitric acid shall be stored only in premises designed and constructed in accordance with all applicable provisions of the building code; and it shall be unlawful to permit sawdust, hay, excelsior, or any organic substance, or other acids or chemicals in close proximity to such carboys or stocks of nitric acid. A sufficient quantity of sand or infusorial earth shall be provided for absorbing all waste liquids from floors.
         . . . . . . . . . .
      (6)   Former Fire Department Rule § 15-05.
         § 15-05 Fire Protection in Wholesale Drug and Chemical Supply Houses. The following shall be deemed to be in compliance with § 27-4237(3) of the Administrative Code of the City of New York:
         . . . . . . . . . .
         (d)   Where such storage does not exceed 75 percent of the quantities allowed in § 27-4241, Administrative Code. For each 2,500 square feet of floor area or major portion thereof:
         . . . . . . . . . .
         Thermostatic alarm
         (e)   Where the storage exceeds 75 percent of the allowable quantity, an automatic sprinkler system is required.
         (f)   When the building exceeds four stories, an automatic sprinkler system is required.
         (g)   In any building where explosives and flammable substances are used or handled, if the area exceeds 5,000 square feet per floor an automatic sprinkler system is required.
         (h)   In any building exceeding 10,000 square feet per floor, an automatic sprinkler system is required.
   (f)   Retail Drug Stores.
      (1)   Former Administrative Code § 27-4246.
         § 27-4246 Quantities of supplies allowed. It shall be unlawful to store, sell or use in a retail drug store any of the following substances in quantities greater than those set forth in the following schedule:
 1.   Acids.
Carbolic
100  pounds
Hydrochloric
200  pounds
Nitric
15  pounds
Picric
1  ounce
Sulphuric
200  pounds
2.   Volatile flammable liquids.
Acetone
5  pounds
Amyl acetate
1  gallon
Amyl alcohol
1  gallon
Amyl nitrate
2 ounces in one ounce bottles six dozen pearls
Ethyl alcohol
1  barrel
Benzine, benzole and naphtha of any kind
5 gallons in four ounce bottles or pint tins
Carbon bisulphide
3  pounds
Collodion
5  pounds
Denatured alcohol
1  barrel
Ether, sulphuric
5  pounds
Methyl alcohol
1  barrel
Other ethers, in all
2  pounds
Turpentine
1  barrel
3.   Flammable liquids.
Essential oils
100  pounds in all
Glycerine
500  pounds
Pine tar
10  pounds
4.   Combustible solids.
Aluminum (powder)
1  pound
Balsams and resins
50  pounds in all
Camphor
350  pounds
Charcoal, powdered
10  pounds
Lampblack
10  pounds
Magnesium (powder)
8  ounces
Magnesium (ribbon)
8  ounces
Naphthalene
4  barrels
Phosphorus, red
2  ounces
Phosphorus, yellow
1  ounce
Rosin
10  pounds
Sulphur and brimstone
250  pounds in all
5.   Combustible fibres.
Cotton, absorbent
150  pounds in cartons
Cotton, batts
10 pounds in closed boxes or other containers
Cotton, loose
5 pounds in closed boxes or other containers
Excelsior, hay and straw
2 bales (except in stores located in tenement houses)
Lint
10 pounds in closed boxes or other containers
Oakum
10 pounds in closed boxes or other containers
6.   Oxidizers.
Barium peroxide
1  pound
Bismuth subnitrate
20  pounds
Calcium peroxide
5  pounds
Chromic acid
1  pound
Lead oxide (red)
5  pounds
Lime, unslaked
200  pounds in sealed metal cans
All other metallic bichromates or chromates
50  pounds in all
Mercuric oxide (red)
2  pounds
Mercurous oxide
2  pounds
Mercury nitrate
1  pound
Phosphides
10  ounces in all
Potassium bichromate
10  pounds
Potassium chlorate
25 pounds in five pound containers or less
Potassium nitrate
50  pounds
Potassium perchlorate
1  ounce
Potassium permanganate
5  pounds
Silver nitrate
1  pound
Silver oxide
1  ounce
Sodium bichromate
10  pounds
Sodium chlorate
5  pounds
Sodium nitrate
25  pounds
Sodium permanganate
1  pound
The commissioner may, in his or her discretion, when no extra hazard is permitted thereby, authorize the storage of larger quantities of substances than those set forth in the foregoing schedule, or of other explosives or flammable substances not specifically named therein.
   (g)   Non-Production Chemical Laboratories.
      (1)   Former Fire Department Rule § 10-01.
         § 10-01 Storage and Use of Chemicals, Acids and Gases in College, University, Hospital, Research and Commercial Laboratories.
         (a)   Definitions.
         . . . . . . . . . .
         Laboratory. Laboratory means a generic term denoting a building, space, equipment or operation, wherein testing, research or experimental work is conducted and shall include laboratories used for instructional purposes.
         Laboratory Building. Laboratory building means a structure consisting wholly or principally of one or more laboratory units.
         Laboratory Unit. Laboratory unit means an enclosed, fire rated space used for testing, research, experimental or educational purposes. Laboratory units may or may not include offices, lavoratories, and other contiguous rooms maintained for, or used by, laboratory personnel, and corridors within the units. It may contain one or more separate laboratory work areas.
         Laboratory Work Area. Laboratory work area means a room or space within a laboratory unit for testing, analysis, research, instruction, or similar activities which involve the use of chemicals or gases. A work area may or may not be enclosed.
            Exception: This section shall not apply to physical, electronic, instrument or similar laboratories which use small quantities (less than 32 oz. flammable liquids, 0.5 lb. oxidizing materials, and 0.15 cu.ft. water container capacity of flammable gases) for incidental purposes such as cleaning, maintenance or repair and these substances are not used directly in experimental chemical research work.
         . . . . . . . . . .
         Storage Cabinet. Storage cabinet means a cabinet for the storage of not more than 60 gallons of flammable liquid which is designed and constructed in accordance with "OSHA General Industry Standards-Flammable and Combustible Liquids".
         Storage Room. Storage room means a room where chemicals or gases regulated by this directive are stored and not otherwise used or reacted.
         Unstable (Reactive) Chemical. Unstable (reactive) chemical means a substance, other than one classified as an explosive or blasting agent, which will vigorously and energetically react, is potentially explosive, will polymerize or decompose instantaneously, undergo uncontrollable auto-reaction or can be exploded by heat, shock, pressure or combinations thereof. Examples are: organic peroxides, nitromethane, and ammonium nitrate.
         . . . . . . . . . .
         (d)   Storage.
            (1)   Storage of chemicals for use in individual laboratory units shall be in accordance with Table I below. Any amounts in addition to the maxima set forth in Table I below shall be at the discretion of the Commissioner and shall be in storage cabinets.
            (2)   Determination of the fire rating of laboratory unit enclosures shall be in accordance with the criteria of the Building Code, except that, in partitions not required to have a fire rating under the provisions of that Code, fire dampers shall not be required to be installed in existing ducts penetrating existing laboratory partitions.
            (3)   Storage of volatile flammable oils shall be in accordance with Table I of this section.
Table I
Maximum Laboratory Unit Storage Limits
 
Lab Type
Fire Rating
Fire Protection
Flammable Liquids and
Flammable Solids
Oxidizing Materials
Unstable Reactive
I
2 Hours
Sprinklers
30 gals
15 lbs
50 lbs
12 lbs
II
1 Hour
Sprinklers
25 gals
10 lbs
40 lbs
6 lbs
III
2 Hours
No Sprinklers
20 gals
6 lbs
30 lbs
3 lbs
IV
1 Hour
No Sprinklers
15 gals
3 lbs
20 lbs
2 lbs
. . . . . . . . . .
            (5)   Storage and use of flammable gases within laboratory units shall be in accordance with Table II below, except that no storage of flammable gases shall be allowed in any laboratory unit where there is not an on-going operation requiring their use. On-going operations shall allow storage of flammable gases sufficient to meet the operating requirements of the equipment in that laboratory unit plus an equal reserve.
Table II
Storage of Flammable Gases
 
Area of Laboratory in square feet**
up to 500 sq. ft.
per additional 100 sq. ft.
Maximum per Laboratory Unit
Maximum Capacity
9.24
1.54
15.4
**Water container capacity
. . . . . . . . . .
            (9)   Storage rooms shall be of a minimum 2 hour rated construction and shall be provided with:
               (i)   a constant mechanical exhaust system to the exterior capable of providing at least six changes of air per hour;
               (ii)   a sill at the doorway (except that no sill shall be required at doorways of flammable gas storage rooms);
               (iii)   a sprinkler system providing at least one head per 90 sq. ft.
. . . . . . . . . .
            (13)   All fixed electrical equipment within cold rooms where flammable liquids or flammable gases are used shall be explosion proof in accordance with subdivision (f)(3) of this section. Cold rooms shall not be used for storage of principal stock of flammable gases or flammable liquids.
         (e)   Signs and warning placards.
            (1)   A sign prohibiting smoking shall be conspicuously posted at the exterior of entrances to storage and laboratory areas and within such areas.
            (2)   Signs with RED letters of minimum size two inches high by three-eighths inch stroke on a contrasting background shall be posted at entrances to areas:
               (i)   Where materials which react with water are stored or used.
               (ii)   Where flammable gases or explosives are stored or used.
            (3)   Warning placards in conformance with Federal, State and Local regulations shall be posted at entrances to areas:
               (i)   Where radioactive material is stored or used;
               (ii)   Where biohazardous material is stored or used;
               (iii)   Where poisonous gases are stored or used.
            (4)   The outside of each chemical laboratory unit door shall have a sign, as detailed below, or metal or other durable material, with RED letters on a white background which shall be located in the area of the mid-point of the height of the door.
         (f)   Fire prevention and protection.
            (1)   In laboratories and storage rooms which are sprinkled, the protection area per sprinkler head shall not exceed 90 sq. ft., except that the protection area per sprinkler head shall not exceed 100 sq. ft. where the system is hydraulically designed.
            (2)   In existing buildings, water supply to sprinkler systems may be taken off existing standpipes provided that the system is hydraulically designed.
            (3)   All electrical equipment in all flammable liquid and all flammable gas storage rooms shall conform with the requirements of the New York City Electrical Code set forth in § 27-3198(4), Administrative Code, irrespective of whether such room would be classified as a Class I Location by § 27-3197(1) of such code.
            (4)   Laboratory units and laboratory work areas shall be considered as unclassified electrically with respect to § 27-3197 of the Administrative Code.
            (5)   Fume hoods shall be provided and utilized in conformance with these requirements and those of such other agencies as have jurisdiction over operations and special storage conditions which give off noxious odors or flammable or poisonous vapors, or radioactive materials.
            (6)   Fume hoods shall be so vented that a minimum average face velocity of 100 feet per minute, with minimum face velocity at any point not less than 75 feet per minute, is provided.
            (7)   Fume hoods shall be located away from doors, windows that may be opened, principal traffic lanes or room air outlets or returns which may cause drafts sufficient to interfere with exhaust operations of fume hoods.
            (8)   Every fume hood used for handling perchloric acids, strong oxidizing agents or highly reactive chemicals shall be served by an independent duct.
            (9)   Common ducts may be permitted for fume hoods in the same laboratory unit. Hoods in different laboratory units shall not have their ducts combined. Hoods in common ducts must be so arranged or equipped that exhaust from one duct cannot be forced out through any other hood served by the common duct.
            (10)   Exhaust ducts shall have the minimum number of turns, bends or obstructions as is practical, and shall have adequate air movement in the duct for the number of hoods vented by that duct and sufficient to prevent any back up into the hood.
            (11)   Washdown provisions shall be provided for hoods and ducts in which perchloric acid is heated above ambient temperature and in which vapors are not trapped or scrubbed before entering the hood exhaust system.
            (12)   Exhaust fans for ducts shall, wherever possible, be located outside the building and as close as possible to the terminal so that negative pressure is maintained in ducts within the building.
            (13)   A system of explosion hazard control consisting of explosion prevention, explosion suppression, explosion venting, area ventilation, extinguishment system(s), barrier protection, separation and isolation, remove controlled apparatus or any combination thereof, shall be provided in laboratories or storage rooms where any of the following conditions occur:
               (i)   Storage of materials which in themselves are readily capable of detonation or of an explosive decomposition or explosive reaction at normal ambient temperature and pressure.
               (ii)   Use of materials which explode, violently decompose or produce rapid increases in pressure and temperature upon:
                  (A)   Vacuum distillation;
                  (B)   Being subjected to slight or moderate shock;
                  (C)   Exposure to ultraviolet or visible light;
                  (D)   Exposure to pressure or more than one atmosphere;
                  (E)   Exposure to temperature in excess of 122(degrees)F. or 50(degrees)C.;
                  (F)   Exposure to air;
                  (G)   Increase in the concentration above which the substance is not longer stable;
                  (H)   Standing (i.e. spontaneously).
               (iii)   Highly exothermic reactions which also involve rapid increases in pressure, such as certain polymerizations, oxidations, nitrations, peroxidations, hydrations, or organometallic reactions.
               (iv)   Use or formation of materials whose chemical structure or functional group indicate potential hazard, but whose properties have not been established. Examples would be triple bonds, epoxy radicals, nitro and [;nitroso]; nitrous compounds, and peroxides.
            (14)   The commissioner shall evaluate the method of explosion hazard control, on an individual basis, considering in each instance the following criteria:
               (i)   The nature and quantity of the constituent material(s);
               (ii)   The nature of the process;
               (iii)   The potential energy release;
               (iv)   Isolation of the equipment;
               (v)   The particular physical location and exposures.
. . . . . . . . . .
      (2)   Former Fire Department Rule § 34-01
         § 34-01 Storage and Use of Limited Quantities of Chemicals, Acids, and Flammables for Instruction Purposes in [Public High] Schools Through the Twelfth Grade.
         (a)   No liquefied chlorine may be stored in any school.
         (b)   No more than five (5) gallons of volatile flammable oils derived from petroleum, shale oil or coal tar should be stored at any one time.
         (c)   No more than twenty-five (25) pounds of potassium and/or sodium chlorate is permitted to be stored.
         (d)   No chemicals or substances as listed under §§ 27-4240 and 27-4234 of the Administrative Code should be stored in a school.
. . . . . . . . . .
         (i)   The storage of dangerous chemicals, volatile flammable oils and liquids shall be confined to metal cabinets vented at top and bottom. A cardholder should be provided for a visible record of the contents and maximum amount stored therein; also, a caution sign, if applicable to read: "In case of fire do not use water."
. . . . . . . . . .
Note: The foregoing rules shall be the basis for the issuance of Fire Department permits to schools throughout the City of New York.
         (l)   Listed below are the maximum quantities of combustibles and dangerous chemicals which may be stored in [public high] schools through the twelfth grade:
Explosives 
Picric Acid
1 lb.
Carbon Bisulphide
10 lbs.
Carbon Dioxide
1 lb.
Anhydrous Ammonia
1 lb.
Sulphur Dioxide
1 lb.
Nitrous Oxide
1 lb.
Oxygen
1 lb.
 
 Volatile Flammable Liquids (Insoluble) 
Crude Petroleum
2 lbs.
Benzine, Benzola or Naphthas of any kind
2 lbs.
Ether, Sulphuric
10 lbs.
Varnishes, Lacquers, etc.
2 lbs.
 
 Volatile Flammable Liquids (Soluble)
Acetone
1 lb.
Alcohol, Denatured
5 gals.
Aylcohol, Methyl
5 gals.
 
Non-Volatile Flammable Liquids (Insoluble) 
Amyl Acetate
2 lbs.
Amyl Alcohol
2 lbs.
Aniline Oil
1 lb.
 
Non-Volatile Flammable Liquids (Insoluble)
Kerosene
2 lbs.
Turpentine
1/2 gal.
Tuluol
1 gal.
Xylol
1 gal.
Essential Oils
2 lbs.
 
Non-Volatile Flammable Liquids (Soluble)
Glycerine
5 lbs.
 
Combustible Solids
Phospherous
1/4 lb.
Phospherous, Red
5 lbs.
Sulphur
15 lbs.
Metallic Magnesium
1 lb.
 
Gums, Resins, Pitch, Etc.
Camphor
1 lb.
Resin
11 lb.
Venice Turpentine
1 lb.
Naphthaline
1 lb.
Shellac
1 lb.
 
Combustible Fibres and Powders (Vegetable)
Pulverized Charcoal
5 lbs.
Cotton, Absorbent
5 lbs.
Lampblack
2 lbs.
Lycopodium
1 lb.
 
Dangerously Corrosive Acids
Glacial Acetic Acid
5 gals.
Hydrofluoric Acid
1 lb.
Hydrochloric Acid
12 gals.
Sulphuric Acid
12 gals.
Carbolic Acid
1 lb.
 
Acids
Acid, Chromic
1 lb.
Acid, Nitric
12 gals.
 
Peroxides 
Hydrogen Peroxide, U.S.P.
0 lbs.
Sodium Peroxide
2 lbs.
Barium Peroxide
2 lbs.
Other Hydrogen Peroxides over 3 percent, not to exceed 15 percent
5 lbs.
 
Chlorates
Potassium Chlorate
15 lbs.
 
Permanganates
Potassium Permanganates
1 lb.
 
Nitrates
Barium Nitrate
1 lb.
Stontium Nitrate
1 lb.
Cobalt Nitrate
1 lb.
Copper Nitrate
1 lb.
Iron Nitrate, Ferric Mercury Nitrate (mercuric)
1 lb.
Mercury Nitrate (mercurous)
lb.
Potassium Nitrate
10 lbs.
Silver Nitrate
5 lbs.
Sodium Nitrate
15 lbs.
Other Metallic Nitrates
5 lbs.
 
Metallic Oxides
Lead Oxide (red)
5 lbs.
Lead Oxide (Litharge)
10 lbs.
Oxide of Mercury red precipitate (mercuric)
10 lbs.
Oxide of Mercury; yellow precipitate (mercurous)
5 lbs.
 
Substances Made Dangerous by Contact with Other Substances
Calcium Carbide
5 lbs.
Metallic Potassium
1/2 lb.
All other Metals of the Alkalies or Alkaline Earths
2 lbs.
Metallic Sodium
1/2 lb.
Zinc Dust
5 lbs.
Slaked Lime
25 lbs.

Related Code Sections

Section G201 Flood-Resistant Construction, Definitions
DESIGN FLOOD ELEVATION. FLOOD or FLOODING. FLOOD-DAMAGE-RESISTANT MATERIALS. FLOOD HAZARD AREA. FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP (FIRM). FLOOD ...
G102.1 Flood-Resistant Construction, General
to site improvements, including but not limited to, temporary or permanent storage of materials, mining, dredging, filling, grading, paving ...
G102.1 Flood-Resistant Construction, General
or equipment in a space within the structure where similar pre-FIRM components, materials, finishes or equipment already exist ...